Thornton Line

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The Thornton Line is a boundary line or partition line surveyed in 1696 through the Province of New Jersey during the colonial period, separating the territory into two proprietary colonies: the Province of East Jersey and the Province of West Jersey. New Jersey was divided into two proprietary colonies after the Duke of York's 1664 grant of the colony to Sir George Carteret and John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, and the sale of rights under the Quintipartite Deed in 1676. The Thornton Line was an attempt to replace the errors of the Keith line (1686) and its amendment the Coxe–Barclay Line (1688) which was disowned by the East Jersey proprietors in 1695. While it appears on Worlidge's map of the two Jersey colonies, it was never formally adopted. [1]

Province of New Jersey English, from 1707, British, possession in North America between 1664 and 1776

The Province of New Jersey was one of the Middle Colonies of Colonial America and became New Jersey, a state of United States in 1783. The province had originally been settled by Europeans as part of New Netherland, but came under English rule after the surrender of Fort Amsterdam in 1664, becoming a proprietary colony. The English then renamed the province after the Isle of Jersey in the English Channel. The Dutch Republic reasserted control for a brief period in 1673–1674. After that it consisted of two political divisions, East Jersey and West Jersey, until they were united as a royal colony in 1702. The original boundaries of the province were slightly larger than the current state, extending into a part of the present state of New York, until the border was finalized in 1773.

East Jersey English possession in North America between 1674 and 1702

The Province of East Jersey, along with the Province of West Jersey, between 1674 and 1702 in accordance with the Quintipartite Deed were two distinct political divisions of the Province of New Jersey, which became the U.S. state of New Jersey. The two provinces were amalgamated in 1702. East Jersey's capital was located at Perth Amboy. Determination of an exact location for a border between West Jersey and East Jersey was often a matter of dispute.

West Jersey English possession in North America between 1674 and 1702

West Jersey and East Jersey were two distinct parts of the Province of New Jersey. The political division existed for 28 years, between 1674 and 1702. Determination of an exact location for a border between West Jersey and East Jersey was often a matter of dispute.

See also

The Lawrence Line was a boundary line or partition line drawn through the Province of New Jersey during the colonial period, dividing it into the Province of West Jersey and the Province of East Jersey. The line was created by surveyor John Lawrence in 1743, and sought to offer final resolution to the division between the two proprietary colonies set out on the Quintipartite Deed (1676) which divided New Jersey by a straight line from "the Northernmost Branch of said Bay or River of De la Ware which is in forty-one Degrees and forty minutes of latitude…unto the most southwardly poynt of the East syde of Little Egge Harbour." Several previous surveys, including the Keith Line (1686), the Coxe–Barclay Line (1688), the Thornton Line (1696) were disputed and drawn too far west. Lawrence was commissioned in 1743 to resolve the long-standing disputes.

New York – New Jersey Line War

The New York – New Jersey Line War was a series of skirmishes and raids that took place for over half a century between 1701 and 1765 at the disputed border between two American colonies, the Province of New York and the Province of New Jersey.

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The Coxe–Barclay Line was a boundary line or partition line drawn through the Province of New Jersey during the colonial period, dividing it into the Province of West Jersey and the Province of East Jersey. Surveyor General George Keith surveyed a northwesterly partition line from Little Egg Harbor that veered too far to the west, and was stopped by the order of Dr. Daniel Coxe, the governor of West Jersey. Keith ended his line when he reached the South Branch of the Raritan River in what is now Three Bridges in Readington Township. Governor Coxe, and his East Jersey counterpart, Governor Robert Barclay met in London to set a compromise boundary following the South and North Branches of the Raritan River, the Lamington River, a straight line to the head of the Passaic River, along the Pompton and Pequannock Rivers, and then a straight line northeast to New Jersey–New York border. The East Jersey proprietors disowned this line in 1695 and it was formally rescinded by the colonial legislature in 1718.

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References

  1. Worlidge, John. A New Mapp of East and West New Jersey being an exact survey Taken by Mr John Worlidge. (London, c. 1696).

Coordinates: 39°36′55″N74°18′06″W / 39.6152°N 74.3016°W / 39.6152; -74.3016

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.