Three Little Pigs (disambiguation)

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The Three Little Pigs is a well-known fairy tale. Three Little Pigs may also refer to:

<i>The Three Little Pigs</i> fairy tale

The Three Little Pigs is a fable about three pigs who build three houses of different materials. A Big Bad Wolf blows down the first two pigs' houses, made of straw and sticks respectively, but is unable to destroy the third pig's house, made of bricks. Printed versions date back to the 1840s, but the story itself is thought to be much older. The phrases used in the story, and the various morals drawn from it, have become embedded in Western culture. Many versions of The Three Little Pigs have been recreated or have been modified over the years, sometimes making the wolf a kind character. It is a type B124 folktale in the Aarne–Thompson classification system.

Contents

Places

Three Little Pigs (islands)

Three Little Pigs is a chain of three small islands 0.56 kilometres (0.3 nmi) northwest of Winter Island in the Argentine Islands, Wilhelm Archipelago. The chain was charted and named in 1935 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under John Riddoch Rymill.

Art, entertainment, and media

Films

The 3 L'il Pigs is a 2007 Canadian French-language comedy film. The directorial debut of comedian and actor Patrick Huard, the film won the Golden Reel Award at the 28th Genie Awards and the Billet d'or at the Jutra Awards as top-grossing film of 2007 in Quebec.

Literature

<i>The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs!</i> American childrens picture book, 1989, parody of the fable

The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs! is a children's book by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. Released in a number of editions since its first release by Harper & Row Publishers in 1989 and re-published the name of Viking in 1993, it is a parody of The Three Little Pigs as told by the Big Bad Wolf, known in the book as "A. Wolf," short for "Alexander T. Wolf." The book was honored by the American Library Association as an ALA Notable Book.

Music

Three Little Pigs (song)

"Three Little Pigs" is a song by heavy metal comedy band Green Jellÿ, from the album Cereal Killer. Released by Zoo Entertainment in 1992 with the original band name, Green Jellö, the single was re-released in 1993 under the name Green Jellÿ due to a lawsuit for trademark infringement by the owners of Jell-O.

Other uses

Les Trois Petits Cochons also known as Three Little Pigs is an American charcuterie company founded in 1975 in Greenwich Village of New York City. The company was founded by French chefs Alain Sinturel and Jean-Pierre Pradie along with their business partner Harvey Milstein.

Charcuterie Branch of cooking of prepared meat products, primarily from pork

Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines, ballotines, pâtés, and confit, primarily from pork.

See also

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