Tibial vein

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Tibial vein may refer to:

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Popliteal artery

The popliteal artery is a deeply placed continuation of the femoral artery after it passes through the adductor hiatus, or opening in the distal portion of the adductor magnus muscle. It courses through the popliteal fossa and ends at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, where it branches into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.

Popliteal vein Large leg vein

The popliteal vein is formed by the junction of the venae comitantes of the anterior and posterior tibial vein at the lower border of the popliteus muscle on the medial side of the popliteal artery. As it ascends through the fossa, it crosses behind the popliteal artery so that it comes to lie on its lateral side. It passes through the adductor hiatus to become the femoral vein.

Deep vein Veins deep in the body; contrasted with superficial veins

A deep vein is a vein that is deep in the body. This contrasts with superficial veins that are close to the body's surface.

Posterior tibial vein

In anatomy, there are two posterior tibial veins of the lower limb. They receive blood from the medial and lateral plantar veins and drain the posterior compartment of the leg and the plantar surface of the foot to the popliteal vein which it forms when it joins with the anterior tibial vein.

Anterior tibial vein

The anterior tibial vein is a vein in the lower leg.

In anatomy, the fibular veins are accompanying veins of the fibular artery.

The posterior tibial artery of the lower limb carries blood to the posterior compartment of the leg and plantar surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery via the tibial-fibular trunk. It is accompanied by a deep vein, the posterior tibial vein, along its course.

The anterior tibial artery of the leg carries blood to the anterior compartment of the leg and dorsal surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome compression neuropathy and painful foot condition in which the tibial nerve is compressed as it travels through the tarsal tunnel

Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS), also known as posterior tibial neuralgia, is a compression neuropathy and painful foot condition in which the tibial nerve is compressed as it travels through the tarsal tunnel. This tunnel is found along the inner leg behind the medial malleolus. The posterior tibial artery, tibial nerve, and tendons of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, and flexor hallucis longus muscles travel in a bundle through the tarsal tunnel. Inside the tunnel, the nerve splits into three segments. One nerve (calcaneal) continues to the heel, the other two continue on to the bottom of the foot. The tarsal tunnel is delineated by bone on the inside and the flexor retinaculum on the outside.

Popliteal fossa The back of your knee

The popliteal fossa is a shallow depression located at the back of the knee joint. The bones of the popliteal fossa are the femur and the tibia. Like other flexion surfaces of large joints, it is an area where blood vessels and nerves pass relatively superficially, and with an increased amount of lymph nodes.

Tibial may refer to:

Anterior tibial may refer to:

Posterior tibial may refer to:

Plantar venous arch

The four plantar metatarsal veins run backward in the metatarsal spaces, communicate, by means of perforating veins, with the veins on the dorsum of the foot, and unite to form the plantar venous arch which lies alongside the plantar arterial arch.

Malleolus

A malleolus is the bony prominence on each side of the human ankle.

Tarsal tunnel

The tarsal tunnel is found along the inner leg posterior to the medial malleolus.

Anterior compartment of leg part of the Fascial compartments of leg

The anterior compartment of the leg is a fascial compartment of the lower limb. It contains muscles that produce dorsiflexion and participate in inversion and eversion of the foot, as well as vascular and nervous elements including the anterior tibial artery and veins, and the deep fibular nerve.

Bancroft's sign, also known as Moses' sign, is a clinical sign found in patients with deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg involving the posterior tibial veins. The sign is positive if pain is elicited when the calf muscle is compressed forwards against the tibia, but not when the calf muscle is compressed from side to side. Like other clinical signs for deep vein thrombosis, such as Homans sign and Lowenberg's sign, this sign is neither sensitive nor specific for the presence of thrombosis.

Fibular artery

In anatomy, the fibular artery supplies blood to the lateral compartment of the leg. It arises from the tibial-fibular trunk.

Tibial plateau fracture

A tibial plateau fracture is a break of the upper part of the tibia (shinbone) that involves the knee joint. Symptoms include pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to move the knee. People are generally unable to walk. Complication may include injury to the artery or nerve, arthritis, and compartment syndrome.