Posterior tibial vein

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Posterior tibial vein
Blausen 0609 LegVeins.png
Veins of the leg, where the posterior tibial vein is the medial one of the "Tibial veins".
Details
Source fibular veins
Drains to popliteal vein
Artery posterior tibial artery
Identifiers
Latin venae tibiales posteriores
TA A12.3.11.032
FMA 70926
Anatomical terminology

In anatomy, there are two posterior tibial veins of the lower limb. They receive blood from the medial and lateral plantar veins and drain the posterior compartment of the leg and the plantar surface of the foot to the popliteal vein which it forms when it joins with the anterior tibial vein. [1]

Anatomy The study of the structure of organisms and their parts

Anatomy is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts. Anatomy is a branch of natural science which deals with the structural organization of living things. It is an old science, having its beginnings in prehistoric times. Anatomy is inherently tied to developmental biology, embryology, comparative anatomy, evolutionary biology, and phylogeny, as these are the processes by which anatomy is generated over immediate (embryology) and long (evolution) timescales. Anatomy and physiology, which study (respectively) the structure and function of organisms and their parts, make a natural pair of related disciplines, and they are often studied together. Human anatomy is one of the essential basic sciences that are applied in medicine.

The posterior compartment of the leg is one of the fascial compartments of the leg and is divided further into deep and superficial compartments.

Foot anatomical structure found in vertebrates

The foot is an anatomical structure found in many vertebrates. It is the terminal portion of a limb which bears weight and allows locomotion. In many animals with feet, the foot is a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg made up of one or more segments or bones, generally including claws or nails.

Like most deep veins, posterior tibial veins are accompanied by an homonym artery, the posterior tibial artery, along its course.

Deep vein Veins deep in the body; contrasted with superficial veins

A deep vein is a vein that is deep in the body. This contrasts with superficial veins that are close to the body's surface.

Artery blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart

An artery is a blood vessel that takes blood away from the heart to all parts of the body. Most arteries carry oxygenated blood; the two exceptions are the pulmonary and the umbilical arteries, which carry deoxygenated blood to the organs that oxygenate it. The effective arterial blood volume is that extracellular fluid which fills the arterial system.

The posterior tibial artery of the lower limb carries blood to the posterior compartment of the leg and plantar surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery via the tibial-fibular trunk. It is accompanied by a deep vein, the posterior tibial vein, along its course.

They receive the most important perforator veins: the Cockett perforators, superior, medial and inferior. [2]

Perforator vein

Perforator veins are so called because they perforate the deep fascia of muscles, to connect the superficial veins to the deep veins where they drain.

Additional images

Related Research Articles

Human leg lower extremity or limb of the human body (foot, lower leg, thigh and hip)

The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region. However, the definition in human anatomy refers only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle, also known as the crus. Legs are used for standing, and all forms of locomotion including recreational such as dancing, and constitute a significant portion of a person's mass. Female legs generally have greater hip anteversion and tibiofemoral angles, but shorter femur and tibial lengths than those in males.

Great saphenous vein large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg

The great saphenous vein is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg. It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Popliteal artery

The popliteal artery is a deeply placed continuation of the femoral artery after it passes through the adductor hiatus, or opening in the distal portion of the adductor magnus muscle. It courses through the popliteal fossa and ends at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, where it branches into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.

Tibialis posterior muscle

The tibialis posterior is the most central of all the leg muscles, and is located in the deep posterior compartment of the leg.

Popliteal vein Large leg vein

The popliteal vein is formed by the junction of the venae comitantes of the anterior and posterior tibial vein at the lower border of the popliteus muscle on the medial side of the popliteal artery. As it ascends through the fossa, it crosses behind the popliteal artery so that it comes to lie on its lateral side. It passes through the adductor hiatus to become the femoral vein.

The gastrocnemius muscle is a superficial two-headed muscle that is in the back part of the lower leg of humans. It runs from its two heads just above the knee to the heel, a two joint muscle. The muscle is named via Latin, from Greek γαστήρ (gaster) "belly or stomach" and κνήμη (knḗmē) "leg"; meaning "stomach of leg".

Anterior tibial vein

The anterior tibial vein is a vein in the lower leg.

The anterior tibial artery of the leg carries blood to the anterior compartment of the leg and dorsal surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery.

In human anatomy, the dorsalis pedis artery, is a blood vessel of the lower limb that carries oxygenated blood to the dorsal surface of the foot. It is located 1/3 from medial malleolus. It arises at the anterior aspect of the ankle joint and is a continuation of the anterior tibial artery. It terminates at the proximal part of the first intermetatarsal space, where it divides into two branches, the first dorsal metatarsal artery and the deep plantar artery. The dorsalis pedis communicates with the plantar blood supply of the foot through the deep plantar artery.

Tibial nerve

The tibial nerve is a branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve passes through the popliteal fossa to pass below the arch of soleus.

The flexor digitorum longus is situated on the tibial side of the leg. At its origin it is thin and pointed, but it gradually increases in size as it descends. This muscle serves to curl the second, third, fourth, and fifth toes.

The anterior medial malleolar artery is an artery in the ankle. It arises about 5 cm. above the ankle-joint from the anterior tibial artery.

The flexor retinaculum of foot is a strong fibrous band, extending from the bony ankle prominence (malleolus) above, to the margin of the heelbone (calcaneus) below, converting a series of bony grooves in this situation into canals for the passage of the tendons of the flexor muscles and the posterior tibial vessels and tibial nerve into the sole of the foot.

In anatomy, arterial tree is used to refer to all arteries and/or the branching pattern of the arteries. This article regards the human arterial tree. Starting from the aorta:

Plantar venous arch

The four plantar metatarsal veins run backward in the metatarsal spaces, communicate, by means of perforating veins, with the veins on the dorsum of the foot, and unite to form the plantar venous arch which lies alongside the plantar arterial arch.

Tarsal tunnel

The tarsal tunnel is found along the inner leg posterior to the medial malleolus.

Outline of human anatomy Overview of and topical guide to human anatomy

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to human anatomy:

Fibular artery

In anatomy, the fibular artery supplies blood to the lateral compartment of the leg. It arises from the tibial-fibular trunk.

References

  1. Alcamo (2003). Anatomy Coloring Workbook. New York: Random House Inc. p. 196. ISBN   978-0375763427.
  2. Cavezzi, A.; Labropoulos, N.; Partsch, H.; Ricci, S.; Caggiati, A.; Myers, K.; Nicolaides, A.; Smith, P.C. (2006). "Duplex Ultrasound Investigation of the Veins in Chronic Venous Disease of the Lower Limbs—UIP Consensus Document. Part II. Anatomy". European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. 31 (3): 288–99. doi:10.1016/j.ejvs.2005.07.020. PMID   16230038.