Tibouchina grossa

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Tibouchina grossa
Tibouchina grossa (or reticulata) (9976384276).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Melastomataceae
Genus: Tibouchina
Species:
T. grossa
Binomial name
Tibouchina grossa
(L.f.) Cogn. 1885
Synonyms

Melastoma grossa L.f.
Tibouchina reticulata Cogn.

Tibouchina grossa is a species in the Melastomataceae family that is native to the Andes, Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela, between 2400 and 3800 meters in elevation. [1] Also called "Red Princess Flower" or "Carmine Princess Flower" to differentiate it from its relative "Princess Flower" which has purple blooms. [2] [3]

Contents

Description

The plant is a small tree or shrub growing between 6' - 16' tall. The leaves are dark green and fuzzy with pronounced parallel veining. It blooms year-round and the bright to dark red flowers are about 3". It prefers cooler climates, but is not frost tolerant, and full to partial-sun. It is uncommon in cultivation. [2]

petiole of 5 to 10 mm in length; Leaf blade, thick, elliptical or ovate-elliptical, 5 to 6 cm long by 1 to 3 cm wide; Acute at apex, obtuse or rounded at base. Inflorescences paucifloras terminal in branches and twigs. Brown fruit, in capsule, with several tiny seeds

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