Tinglof Peninsula

Last updated

Map of Thurston Island. Thurston Island - en.svg
Map of Thurston Island.
Satellite image of Thurston Island. ThurstonIsland Terra MODIS.jpg
Satellite image of Thurston Island.

Tinglof Peninsula ( 72°2′S100°6′W / 72.033°S 100.100°W / -72.033; -100.100 Coordinates: 72°2′S100°6′W / 72.033°S 100.100°W / -72.033; -100.100 ) is an ice-covered peninsula, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, between Henry and Wagoner Inlets on the north side of Thurston Island. It was delineated from aerial photographs taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Iver (Ivor) Tinglof, [1] tractor mechanic of the Second Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1933–35, who, at Little America, built the first heavy cargo sleds for use in the Antarctic. [2]

Smith Cliff is a rock cliff midway along the ice-covered northern shore of the peninsula. It was photographed by the Eastern Group of Operation Highjump and later named by US-ACAN after aviation radioman William F. Smith, an aircrewman from the operation. [3]

Maps

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Thurston Island</span> Antarctic island

Thurston Island is an ice-covered, glacially dissected island, 215 km (134 mi) long, 90 km (56 mi) wide and 15,700 km2 (6,062 sq mi) in area, lying a short way off the northwest end of Ellsworth Land, Antarctica. It is the third-largest island of Antarctica, after Alexander Island and Berkner Island.

Bear Peninsula

Bear Peninsula is a peninsula about 80 km (50 mi) long and 40 km (25 mi) wide which is ice covered except for several isolated rock bluffs and outcrops along its margins, lying 48 km 30 mi) east of Martin Peninsula on Walgreen Coast, Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica.

King Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula, 100 nautical miles (200 km) long and 20 nautical miles (40 km) wide, lying south of Thurston Island and forming the south side of Peacock Sound, Antarctica. It projects from the continental ice sheet and trends west between the Abbot Ice Shelf and Cosgrove Ice Shelf to terminate at the Amundsen Sea. The feature was photographed from the air by U.S. Navy Operation HIGHJUMP, 1946–47, and was plotted from these photos as a long island, or possible peninsula. Photos taken by the U.S. Navy in 1966 show it is a peninsula, ⁣but the U.S. Board on Geographic Names published its list of names that same year and designated the area as an island.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Zinberg Glacier</span> Glacier in Antarctica

Zinberg Glacier is a glacier in east Thurston Island; it flows east-northeast into Morgan Inlet between Tierney Peninsula and the promontory ending in Ryan Point. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Cpl. E. Zinberg, U.S. Army photographer in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas, 1946–47.

Zuhn Bluff

Zuhn Bluff is a steep north-facing bluff standing about 5 miles (8 km) east-southeast of Mount Bramhall in the Walker Mountains of Thurston Island. Delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Arthur A. Zuhn, physicist with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1933–35.

Williamson Peninsula

Williamson Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula midway along the south side of Thurston Island. It extends southwest into Abbot Ice Shelf between Schwartz Cove and O'Dowd Cove. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Lieutenant Commander H. E. Williamson, Medical Officer of the seaplane tender Pine Island in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47.

Von der Wall Point

Von der Wall Point is a low ice-covered point on the south side of Thurston Island. It extends into Peacock Sound toward the northeast extremity of Sherman Island. Delineated from aerial photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for J.H. Von der Wall, tractor driver and mechanic with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1933–35.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Noville Peninsula</span> Peninsula in Ellsworthland, Antarctica

Noville Peninsula is a high ice-covered peninsula about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long, between Peale and Murphy Inlets on the north side of Thurston Island in Antarctica. It was delineated from aerial photographs made by U.S. Navy Operation HIGHJUMP in December 1946, and named for George O. Noville, executive officer of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1933–35.

Cape Davies

Cape Davies is an ice-covered cape, lying at the northeast end of Hughes Peninsula, on the north side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. The cape plotted from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946 and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN). The capewas named for Frank Davies, physicist with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE) in 1928-30.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Murphy Inlet</span>

Murphy Inlet is an ice-filled inlet about 18 nautical miles (33 km) long, with two parallel branches at the head, lying between Noville and Edwards Peninsulas on the north side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It was delineated from aerial photographs taken by U.S. Navy Operation HIGHJUMP in December 1946. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Charles J. V. Murphy, assistant to Richard E. Byrd after the Byrd Antarctic Expedition of 1928–30, and member of the wintering party of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition of 1933–35.

Trice Islands Group of islands in Antarctica

Trice Islands is a group of small ice-covered islands lying just west of Evans Point, Thurston Island, in Peacock Sound. The group rises above the general level of Abbot Ice Shelf which occupies the sound. First mapped from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Jack L. Trice, meteorologist at Byrd Station, 1964–65.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Potaka Inlet</span> Landform

Potaka Inlet is a narrow ice-filled inlet about 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, indenting the north side of Thurston Island immediately east of Starr Peninsula. It was first delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Dr. Louis H. Potaka, a medical officer with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1933–35.

Evans Peninsula Peninsula of Ellsworth Land

Evans Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long, between Koether Inlet and Cadwalader Inlet in the northeast part of Thurston Island. Cape Braathen is an ice-covered cape at the northwest termination of Evans Peninsula. It was discovered in flights from the USS Burton Island and USS Glacier by personnel of the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander Griffith Evans, Jr., commander of the icebreaker Burton Island during this expedition.

Morgan Inlet

Morgan Inlet is an ice-filled inlet about 18 nautical miles (33 km) long, with two branches, indenting the east end of Thurston Island, Antarctica, between Lofgren Peninsula and Tierney Peninsula. The south side of the larger north arm of the inlet is an area of icy rock exposures called the King Cliffs. The east extremity of the wedge-shaped promontory between Lofgren Peninsula and Tierney Peninsula is called Ryan Point.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Long Glacier</span> Glacier in Antarctica

Long Glacier is a glacier about 8 nautical miles long in the southeastern part of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It flows south to the Abbot Ice Shelf, 14 nautical miles (26 km) west of Harrison Nunatak. The glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Fred A. Long, Jr., an aviation machinist of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, who wintered at Little America V in 1957 and was in Antarctica in the 1960–61 and 1962–63 seasons.

Lofgren Peninsula Peninsula of Ellsworth Land

Lofgren Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula about 22 nautical miles (40 km) long, projecting between Cadwalader Inlet and Morgan Inlet on the northeast side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. The northern extremity of the peninsula is Cape Menzel, a bold rock cape. These features were discovered in helicopter flights from the USS Burton Island and the USS Glacier of the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names. The peninsula was named for Charles E. Lofgren, personnel officer with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30. The cape was named for Reinhard W. Menzel, a geomagnetist-seismologist with the Eights Station winter party, 1965.

Hughes Peninsula Peninsula in Ellsworth Land

Hughes Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula about 18 nautical miles (33 km) long, lying west of Henry Inlet on the north side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. At the northeast end of the peninsula is ice-covered Cape Davies. These features were plotted from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946 and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names. The peninsula was named for Jerry Hughes, a photographer's mate with the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, who took aerial photographs of Thurston Island from helicopters. The cape was named for Danny Davies, a social worker with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1928–30.

Marck Glacier Glacier in Antarctica

Marck Glacier is a glacier flowing into the southwestern extremity of Cadwalader Inlet on the north side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Aviation Machinist's Mate George H. Marck, an aircrewman in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas in the summer of 1946–47.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Levko Glacier</span> Glacier in Antarctica

Levko Glacier is a glacier flowing from Pallid Crest to the eastern end of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It enters Seraph Bay between Tierney Peninsula and Simpson Bluff. The glacier was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after G. Levko, Photographer's Mate in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas, 1946–47.

Smith Peak is a prominent peak of the Walker Mountains on Thurston Island, Antarctica. It rises southeast of the head of Potaka Inlet and 6 mi (9.7 km) east-northeast of Mount Hubbard. It was first delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump in December 1946 and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Dean C. Smith, aviation pilot of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE) in 1928–30.

References

  1. "Cover to Byrd's Wife from Crew Member", The Ohio State University Libraries. Retrieved 2020-03-31.
  2. "Tinglof Peninsula". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  3. "Smith Cliff". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 30 August 2018.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from websites or documents ofthe United States Geological Survey .