Tinn

Last updated
Tinn kommune
Tind herred (historic)
P1000747Rjukan.JPG
View of Rjukan
Flag of Tinn.gif
Norway Counties Vestfold og Telemark Position.svg
NO 3818 Tinn.svg
Tinn within Vestfold og Telemark
Coordinates: 60°0′33″N8°33′34″E / 60.00917°N 8.55944°E / 60.00917; 8.55944
Country Norway
County Vestfold og Telemark
District Aust-Telemark
Established1 Jan 1838
  Created as Formannskapsdistrikt
Administrative centre Rjukan
Government
  Mayor (2019)Steinar Bergsland (H)
Area
  Total2,045.13 km2 (789.63 sq mi)
  Land1,848.01 km2 (713.52 sq mi)
  Water197.12 km2 (76.11 sq mi)  9.6%
  Rank#34 in Norway
Population
 (2022)
  Total5,512
  Rank#173 in Norway
  Density3/km2 (8/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
Decrease2.svg −7.9%
Demonym Tinndøl [1]
Official language
[2]
   Norwegian form Neutral
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-3818
Website Official website

Tinn is a municipality in Vestfold og Telemark county, Norway. It is located in the traditional districts of Aust-Telemark and Upper Telemark. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Rjukan. Some of the villages in Tinn include Atrå, Austbygde, Hovin, and Miland.

Contents

The 2,045-square-kilometre (790 sq mi) municipality is the 34th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Tinn is the 173rd most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 5,512. The municipality's population density is 3 inhabitants per square kilometre (7.8/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 7.9% over the previous 10-year period. [3] [4]

The Krossobanen is the oldest aerial tramway in Northern Europe. It was built in 1928 as a gift from Norsk Hydro. The Hardangervidda National Park center is located at the lake Møsvatn, just east of Tinn.

General information

The parish of Tind (later spelled "Tinn") was established as a municipality on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). In 1860, the southeastern area of the municipality around the village of Hovin (population: 815) was separated from Tinn to become part of the newly created Gransherad Municipality. On 24 March 1903, an unpopulated area of Tinn Municipality was transferred to Hovin Municipality. During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, the neighboring municipality of Hovin was dissolved. All of Hovin located east of the lake Tinnsjå (population: 461) was merged into Tinn Municipality (the rest of the old Hovin municipality became part of Notodden Municipality). [5]

Name

The municipality (originally the parish) comes from an old name for the area (Old Norse : Tinnr) or an old name for the local Tinnsjå. The name is possibly derived from the word tjǫrn which means "small lake" or "pond". Historically, the name was spelled Tind. [6]

Coat of arms

The coat of arms was granted on 25 November 1994. The official blazon is "Argent, five gouttes de larmes, three and two" (Norwegian : I sølv fem blå dråper, 3-2). This means the arms have a field (background) has a tincture of argent which means it is commonly colored white, but if it is made out of metal, then silver is used. The charge is a set of five gouttes (droplets) of water. This design was chosen to represent the five rivers in the municipality and the hydropower plants near Rjukan. The arms were designed by Halvor Holtskog. The municipal flag has the same design as the coat of arms. [7] [8] [9] [10]

Churches

The Church of Norway has two parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Tinn. It is part of the Øvre Telemark prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Agder og Telemark.

Churches in Tinn
Parish (sokn)Church nameLocation of the churchYear built
Rjukan Dal Church Rjukan 1775
Rjukan Church Rjukan 1915
Tinn Atrå Church Atrå 1836
Austbygde Church Austbygde 1888
Hovin Church Hovin 1850
Mæl Church Miland 1839

History

The Rjukan Falls, located on the Måna river, allowed construction of Vemork, the largest power station in the world in 1911. The station has become a museum where one can explore the history of the energy and see exhibits about the industrial development in Norway and in the town of Rjukan.

The museum at Vemork is most famous for its presentation of Rjukan's war history. During World War II, Vemork was the site of the Norwegian heavy water sabotage, when Norwegian saboteurs prevented the Germans from producing nuclear weapons from the heavy water which was produced here. The exhibit Atomkappløpet ("The nuclear race") presents the four heavy water sabotages and the allied efforts to develop a nuclear bomb.

Government

All municipalities in Norway are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, welfare and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads and utilities. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of directly elected representatives. The mayor is indirectly elected by a vote of the municipal council. [11] The municipality is under the jurisdiction of the Telemark District Court and the Agder Court of Appeal.

Municipal council

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Tinn is made up of 25 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The tables below show the current and historical composition of the council by political party.

Tinn kommunestyre 20202023 [12]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
Total number of members:25
Tinn kommunestyre 20162019 [13] [14]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
  Green Party (Miljøpartiet De Grønne)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:25
Tinn kommunestyre 20122015 [15]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:29
Tinn kommunestyre 20082011 [14]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:29
Tinn kommunestyre 20042007 [14]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)4
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
Total number of members:29
Tinn kommunestyre 20002003 [14] [16]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
Total number of members:29
Tinn kommunestyre 19961999 [17]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)17
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:37
Tinn kommunestyre 19921995 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Conservative Party (Høyre)2
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)5
  Cross-party list (Tverrpolitisk liste)8
Total number of members:37
Tinn kommunestyre 19881991 [19]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
  Cross-party list (Tverrpolitisk liste)10
Total number of members:37
Tinn kommunestyre 19841987 [20]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:37
Tinn kommunestyre 19801983 [21]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)24
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Tinn kommunestyre 19761979 [22]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Tinn kommunestyre 19721975 [23]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:45
Tinn kommunestyre 19681971 [24]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Conservative Party (Høyre)7
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:45
Tinn kommunestyre 19641967 [25]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)26
  Conservative Party (Høyre)7
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)1
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
Total number of members:45
Tinn herredsstyre 19601963 [26]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)27
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:45
Tinn herredsstyre 19561959 [27]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
Total number of members:45
Tinn herredsstyre 19521955 [28]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)25
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)5
Total number of members:44
Tinn herredsstyre 19481951 [29]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
  Conservative Party (Høyre)3
  Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
Total number of members:44
Tinn herredsstyre 19451947 [30]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)44
Total number of members:44
Tinn herredsstyre 19381940* [31]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)22
  Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
 Joint list of the Conservative Party  (Høyre) and the Free-minded People's Party  (Frisinnede Folkeparti)4
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)12
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)1
Total number of members:44
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

Mayors

The mayors (Norwegian : ordfører) of Tinn: [32]

  • 1838-1839: Ole Nilsen Besager
  • 1840-1841: Halvor Torgersen Rollag
  • 1842-1843: Gjermund S. Graver
  • 1844-1845: Søren Schive
  • 1846-1849: Tore Hemsen
  • 1850-1853: Gjermund S. Graver
  • 1854-1861: Ole Knudsen
  • 1862-1863: Ole Gjermundsen Bakke
  • 1864-1881: Ole Knudsen
  • 1882-1883: Ole Gjermundsen Bakke
  • 1884-1885: Hølje H. Klonteig
  • 1886-1895: Ole Knudsen
  • 1896-1899: Ola O. Haugan
  • 1899-1900: Kristen O. Bøen
  • 1901-1916: Knut H. Klonteig
  • 1917-1919: Ole O. Bakke
  • 1920-1937: Johan O. Bryn (V)
  • 1938-1940: Kristen Vaalund (Bp)
  • 1945-1945: L.P. Petersen
  • 1946-1946: Kristen Vaalund (Bp)
  • 1946-1959: Isak Bergan (Ap)
  • 1960-1967: Sigurd Kolltveit (Ap)
  • 1968-1973: Reidar Engell Olsen (Ap)
  • 1974-1987: Einar Haatvedt (Ap)
  • 1987-1993: Øystein Dahle (LL)
  • 1993-1999: Olav Ulleren (Sp)
  • 1999-2003: Berit Stormoen (H)
  • 2004-2010: Erik Haatvedt (Ap)
  • 2010-2011: Turid Opedal (Ap)
  • 2011-2015: Steinar Bergsland (H)
  • 2015-2019: Bjørn Sverre Birkeland (Sp)
  • 2019-present: Steinar Bergsland (H)

Geography

Rjukan–Notodden Industrial Heritage Site
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Ammoniakkvannfabrikken Notodden 1914 1916.jpg
The old ammonia factory at Notodden industrial site
Criteria Cultural: ii, iv
Reference 1486
Inscription2015 (39th Session)
Area4,959.5 ha
Buffer zone33,967.6 ha

Tinn borders the municipality of Nore og Uvdal (in Buskerud county) to the north; Rollag and Flesberg (also in Buskerud) to the east; Notodden, Hjartdal, and Seljord to the south, and Vinje to the west.

Most of Tinn is quite rural. The town of Rjukan is the largest settlement. It is located in the Vestfjorddalen valley, through which the Måna river flows.

Tinn stretches deeply into the Hardangervidda landscape. One landmark in Tinn is the 1,883 metres (6,178 ft) tall mountain Gaustatoppen, which is climbed by 30,000 people each year. On clear days it is possible to see one sixth of Norway from its summit. Other areas include the Blefjell mountains, with Bletoppen being the highest mountain in that area and also the Vegglifjell mountains, with Skirveggen being the highest mountain in that area.

There are several large lakes in Tinn, including Tinnsjå and Kalhovdfjorden.

Notable people

Gunnar Sonsteby, 2008 GunnarSonsteby.jpg
Gunnar Sønsteby, 2008

WWII heavy water saboteurs

Bernt Ivar Eidsvig, 2010 Bernt Ivar Eidsvig.jpg
Bernt Ivar Eidsvig, 2010

Other public Service

Linnea Dale, 2009 Linnea Dale 2.jpg
Linnea Dale, 2009

The Arts

Sport

Tinn haugefjell 1214mosl IMG 0108.JPG
Mountains in the municipality of Tinn, near Rjukan

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  18. "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993. ISBN   8253737939. ISSN   0332-8023.
  19. "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988. ISBN   8253726325. ISSN   0332-8023.
  20. "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984. ISBN   8253720378. ISSN   0332-8023.
  21. "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979. ISBN   8253710836. ISSN   0332-8023.
  22. "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977. ISBN   8253705646.
  23. "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973. ISBN   8253701144.
  24. "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967.
  25. "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964.
  26. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  27. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo, Norge: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  28. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  29. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  30. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  31. "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.
  32. "Ordførarar i Tinn kommune". LokalHistorieWiki.no. Retrieved 24 August 2023.