Toboggan (Conneaut Lake Park)

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Toboggan
Toboggan (Conneaut Lake Park) 2014.jpg
Conneaut Lake Park
Location Conneaut Lake Park
Coordinates 41°38′03″N80°18′49″W / 41.634141°N 80.313679°W / 41.634141; -80.313679 Coordinates: 41°38′03″N80°18′49″W / 41.634141°N 80.313679°W / 41.634141; -80.313679
StatusRemoved
Opening date2002 (2002)
Closing date2006 (2006)
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Chance Rides
Model Toboggan
Height45 ft (14 m)
Length450 ft (140 m)
Duration1:10
Toboggan at RCDB
Pictures of Toboggan at RCDB

The Toboggan was a steel roller coaster located at Conneaut Lake Park in Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania. Purchased from a previous owner in Texas, the ride opened at the park in 2002, operating until 2006. It was located near the midway area of the park, close to the site of the former Dreamland Ballroom. After standing inactive for nearly a decade, the roller coaster was dismantled and moved into storage following the 2014 season.

The ride

A Toboggan is a portable roller coaster that was manufactured by Chance Industries from 1969 to the mid-1970s. The coaster features a small vehicle, holding two people, that climbs vertically inside a hollow steel tower then spirals back down around the same tower. There is a small section of track at the base of the tower with a few small dips and two turns to bring the ride vehicle back to the station. Each vehicle has a single rubber tire with a hydraulic clutch braking system that governs the speed of the vehicle as it descends the tower. The rubber tire engages a center rail that begins halfway through the first spiral. The ride stands 45 feet tall with a track length of 450 feet. A typical ride lasts approximately 70 seconds. [1] [2] [3]

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Toboggan is a portable roller coaster that was built by Chance Industries from 1969 to the mid-1970s. The coaster features a small vehicle, holding two people, that climbs vertically inside a hollow steel tower then spirals back down around the same tower. There is a small section of track at the base of the tower with a few small dips and two turns to bring the ride vehicle back to the station. Each vehicle has a single rubber tire with a hydraulic clutch braking system that governs the speed of the vehicle as it descends the tower. The rubber tire engages a center rail that begins halfway through the first spiral. The ride stands 45 feet tall with a track length of 450 feet. A typical ride lasts approximately 70 seconds.

Summer toboggan

A summer toboggan is an amusement or recreational ride which uses a bobsled-like sled or cart to run down a track usually built on the side of a hill. There are two main types: an Alpine coaster or mountain coaster is a type of roller coaster where the sled runs on rails and is not able to leave the track, whereas with an Alpine slide the sled simply runs on a smooth concave track usually made of metal, concrete or fiberglass. Both of these types of ride are sometimes denoted with the German name Sommerrodelbahn.

References

  1. Toboggan (roller coaster)
  2. Chance, Harold (2004). The Book of Chance. Wichita, Kansas: Wichita Press. p. 48. ISBN   978-0-9649065-0-1
  3. "Toboggan - Conneaut Lake Park (Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania, United States)". rcdb.com. Retrieved 2020-01-04.