Troughton

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Troughton is a surname, and may refer to

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McCabe (surname) Surname list

The surnames McCabe and MacCabe are Irish and Scottish surnames. They are Anglicisations of the Gaelic Mac Cába, a patronymic name meaning "son of Cába". The nickname or personal name Cába is of uncertain origin. The surname can be written in modern Scottish Gaelic as MacCàba and MacCaibe. Patrick Woulfe considered that the surname was possibly derived from a nickname, meaning "a cap", or "hood". Henry Harrison suggested the name was from the Gaelic Mac Aba, meaning "son of the Abbot". If Harrison is to be believed then the surname would have a similar etymology as the surnames MacNab, McNab, which are from the Gaelic Mac an Aba, Mac an Abadh.

Hogan is an Irish surname derived from Irish Ó hÓgáin, a patronymic of Middle Irish ógán, meaning "a youth", in the genitive case, itself from óg, "young", with a prothetic h. A surname of the same form was Anglicised as "Hagan" in Ulster. Some southern bearers claim descent from an uncle of Brian Boru, High King of Ireland (1002–1014). Occasionally appears as an absorption of west Connacht (O')Houghegan. Hypothetically derivable from related words in Cornish and Welsh.

Considine is an Irish surname anglicised from the Gaelic form Mac Consaidín meaning "son of Consaidín" being derived from a foreign Christian name; meaning "son of Constantine". The family were based in Kingdom of Thomond, much of which later became County Clare. The ancestor of the family was Consaidín Ua Briain, a Bishop of Killaloe who died in 1194 and who was the son of Toirdhealbhach mac Diarmada Ua Briain. Notable people with the surname include:

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Gleeson is an Irish surname. It is an anglicisation of the Irish name Ó Glasáin or Ó Gliasáin. The name is most common in County Tipperary but originates in East County Cork, in the once powerful Uí Liatháin kingdom, where the Gleesons were great lords and sometimes kings. Notable people with the surname include:

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