USS Miami

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USS Miami may refer to:

USS <i>Miami</i> (1861)

The first USS Miami was a side-wheel steamer, double-ender gunboat in the United States Navy during the American Civil War.

USS <i>Miami</i> (CL-89)

USS Miami (CL-89) was one of 26 United States Navy Cleveland-class light cruisers completed during or shortly after World War II. The ship, the second US Navy ship to bear the name, was named for the city of Miami, Florida. Miami was commissioned in December 1943, and saw service in several campaigns in the Pacific. Like almost all her sister ships, she was decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, and never saw active service again. Miami was scrapped in the early 1960s.

USS <i>Miami</i> (SSN-755) attack submarine

USS Miami (SSN-755) was a United States Navy Los Angeles-class attack submarine. She was the third vessel of the U.S. Navy to be named after Miami, Florida. Miami was the forty-fourth Los Angeles-class (688) submarine and the fifth Improved Los Angeles-class (688I) submarine to be built and commissioned. The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut, on 28 November 1983 and her keel was laid down on 24 October 1986. She was launched on 12 November 1988 and commissioned on 30 June 1990 with Commander Thomas W. Mader in command.

Related Research Articles

Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition.

USS <i>Reuben James</i> (DE-153)

USS Reuben James (DE-153) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. She was the second ship named for Reuben James, a Boatswain's Mate who distinguished himself fighting the Barbary pirates.

USS <i>Satterlee</i> (DD-190)

USS Satterlee (DD-190) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy, entering service in 1919. After brief service until 1922, the ship was placed in reserve. The ship was reactivated for World War II before being transferred to the Royal Navy in 1940. Renamed HMS Belmont, the destroyer was used as a convoy escort in the Battle of the Atlantic where she was torpedoed and sunk on 31 January 1942.

USS Morris may refer to:

USS <i>Pirate</i> (AM-275)

USS Pirate (AM-275) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was built to clear minefields in offshore waters, and served the Navy in the North Atlantic Ocean and then in the Pacific Ocean. She was returned to active service for the Korean War. During Operation Wonsan she struck a mine and sunk. For her dangerous work, she was awarded four battle stars for her Korean War effort.

<i>Cimarron</i>-class oiler (1939)

The Cimarron-class oilers were an underway replenishment class of oil tankers which were first built in 1939 as "National Defense Tankers," United States Maritime Commission Type T3-S2-A1, designed "to conform to the approved characteristics for naval auxiliaries in speed, radius and structural strength", anticipating their militarization in the event of war. "Tentative plans had been reached with the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey to build ten high-speed tankers with the government paying the cost of the larger engines needed for increased speed. By the first week in December [1937], Standard Oil had solicited and received bids from a number of yards providing for the construction of a number of 16,300-ton (deadweight) capacity tankers. Bids were requested for two versions: a single-screw design of 13 knots and a twin-screw design of 18 knots. The price difference between the two would be used to establish the government's cost subsidy for greater speed. Plans and specifications for both designs were prepared for Standard Oil by naval architect E. L. Stewart. It seems certain that the design for the 18-knot tanker evolved out of the bureau's (C&R) design for a fleet oiler."

USS <i>Brennan</i> (DE-13)

USS Brennan (DE-13) was an Evarts-class destroyer escort constructed for the United States Navy during World War II and commissioned in January 1943. She performed anti-submarine and anti-aircraft convoy protection duties in North Atlantic Ocean waters, and was decommissioned in October 1945 at New York Navy Yard and scrapped in 1946.

USS Knave (AM-256) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic during World War II and was decommissioned in May 1946 and placed in reserve. While she remained in reserve, Knave was reclassified as MSF-256 in February 1955 but never reactivated. In October 1962, she was sold to the Mexican Navy and renamed ARM DM-13. In 1994 she was renamed ARM Cadete Juan Escutia (C56). She was stricken in 2000, but her ultimate fate is not reported in secondary sources.

USS Lance (AM-257) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was built to clear minefields in offshore waters, and served the Navy in the Atlantic Ocean.

USS Lucid (AM-259) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the United States Navy during World War II. It was built to clear minefields in offshore waters, and served the Navy in the Atlantic Ocean.

The second USS Magnet (AM-260) was an Admirable-class minesweeper built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was built to clear minefields in offshore waters, and served the Navy in the Atlantic Ocean.

USS Fulmar (AMc-46) was an Accentor-class coastal minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

Timeline for aircraft carrier service

Aircraft carriers have their origins during the days of World War I. The earliest experiments consisted of fitting temporary "flying off" platforms to the gun turrets of the warships of several nations, notably the United States and the United Kingdom. The first ship to be modified with a permanent flight deck was the battlecruiser HMS Furious, which initially had a single flying-off deck forward of the original superstructure. Subsequently, she was modified with a separate "landing on" deck aft and later with a full flush deck. Other ships, often liners, were modified to have full flush flight decks, HMS Argus being the first to have such modification begun. Those first faltering steps gave little indication of just how important the aircraft carrier was to prove to be. During the inter-war years, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States built up significant carrier fleets so that by the beginning of World War II, they had 18 carriers between them. The 1940 Battle of Taranto and the 1941 Attack on Pearl Harbor in retrospect showed the world that the aircraft carrier was to be the most important ship in the modern fleet. Today, aircraft carriers are the capital ships of the navies they serve in, and in the case of modern US "supercarriers", they embark an airgroup that is effectively a small air force.

USS <i>PGM-18</i>

USS PGM-18 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was built and originally commissioned as USS PC-1255, a PC-461-class submarine chaser, and was decommissioned and converted in late 1944. USS PGM-18 struck a mine off the coast of Okinawa in April 1945; 13 men lost their lives when PGM-18 sank.

USS <i>Truxtun</i> (APD-98)

USS Truxtun (APD-98) was a Crosley-class high-speed transport commissioned in the United States Navy from 1945 to 1946. In 1965, she was transferred to the Republic of China Navy and served as ROCS Fu Shan (PF-35) until 1996. Afterwards, she was scrapped.

USS <i>Upham</i> (APD-99)

USS Upham (APD-99), ex-DE-283, was a United States Navy high-speed transport in commission from 1945 to 1946.

USS Julius A. Raven (APD-110), ex-DE-600, was a United States Navy high-speed transport in commission from 1945 to 1946. She later served in the Republic of Korea Navy as ROKS Ung Po (PG-83).