USS Triumph

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USS Triumph may refer to:

USS <i>Triumph</i> (AM-323) Auk-class minesweeper

USS Triumph (AM-323) was a World War II Auk-class minesweeper of the United States Navy.

USNS <i>Triumph</i> (T-AGOS-4)

USNS Triumph (T-AGOS-4) was a Stalwart-class ocean surveillance ship of the United States Navy. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register in 1995. On 1 October 2012 the ship was disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration. As of May 2015, Triumph was held as a reserve asset for spare parts for sister ships General Rudder and State of Michigan.

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Newport News Shipbuilding shipyard in the United States

Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, is the largest industrial employer in Virginia, and sole designer, builder and refueler of United States Navy aircraft carriers and one of two providers of U.S. Navy submarines. Founded as the Chesapeake Dry Dock and Construction Co. in 1886, Newport News Shipbuilding has built more than 800 ships, including both naval and commercial ships. Located in the city of Newport News, their facilities span more than 550 acres (2.2 km2), strategically positioned in one of the great harbors of the East Coast.

<i>Ohio</i>-class submarine class of US nuclear ballistic missile submarines

The Ohio class of nuclear-powered submarines is the sole class of ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) currently in service with the United States Navy. Fourteen of the eighteen boats are SSBNs, which, along with U.S. Air Force strategic bombers and intercontinental ballistic missiles, constitute the nuclear-deterrent triad of the U.S. The remaining four have been converted from their initial roles as SSBNs to cruise missile submarines (SSGNs). The Ohio-class boats, each displacing 18,750 tons submerged, are the third largest submarines in the world, behind the 48,000-ton Typhoon class and 24,000-ton Borei class of the Russian Navy. The Ohio class replaced the Benjamin Franklin- and Lafayette-class SSBNs.

Toledo most commonly refers to:

<i>Arleigh Burke</i>-class destroyer class of guided missile destroyers

The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers (DDGs) is the United States Navy's first class of destroyer built around the Aegis Combat System and the SPY-1D multifunction passive electronically scanned array radar. The class is named for Admiral Arleigh Burke, an American destroyer officer in World War II, and later Chief of Naval Operations. The class leader, USS Arleigh Burke, was commissioned during Admiral Burke's lifetime.

Ingalls Shipbuilding shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi

Ingalls Shipbuilding is a shipyard located in Pascagoula, Mississippi, United States, originally established in 1938, and now part of Huntington Ingalls Industries. It is a leading producer of ships for the United States Navy, and at 12,500 employees, the second largest private employer in Mississippi with WalMart being the largest with 24,000 employees.

Bath Iron Works American shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine

Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a major United States shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine, founded in 1884 as Bath Iron Works, Limited. BIW has built private, commercial, and military vessels, most of which have been ordered by the United States Navy. The shipyard has built and sometimes designed battleships, frigates, cruisers, and destroyers, including the Arleigh Burke class which are currently among the world's most advanced surface warships.

Guided missile destroyer Destroyer equipped with guided missiles

A guided-missile destroyer is a destroyer designed to launch guided missiles. Many are also equipped to carry out anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface operations. The NATO standard designation for these vessels is DDG. Nations vary in their use of destroyer D designation in their hull pennant numbering, either prefixing or dropping it altogether. The U.S. Navy has adopted the classification DDG in the American hull classification system.

Light aircraft carrier aircraft carrier that is smaller than the standard carriers of a navy

A light aircraft carrier, or light fleet carrier, is an aircraft carrier that is smaller than the standard carriers of a navy. The precise definition of the type varies by country; light carriers typically have a complement of aircraft only one-half to two-thirds the size of a full-sized fleet carrier. A light carrier was similar in concept to an escort carrier in most respects, however light carriers were intended for higher speeds to be deployed alongside fleet carriers, while escort carriers usually defended convoys and provided air support during amphibious operations.

Ten ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Triumph. Another was planned, but renamed before being launched:

New York Shipbuilding Corporation shipbuilding company

The New York Shipbuilding Corporation was an American shipbuilding company that operated from 1899 to 1968, ultimately completing more than 500 vessels for the U.S. Navy, the United States Merchant Marine, the United States Coast Guard, and other maritime concerns. At its peak during World War II, NYSB was the largest and most productive shipyard in the world. Its best-known vessels include the destroyer USS Reuben James (DD-245), the cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35), the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), the nuclear-powered cargo ship NS Savannah, and a quartet of cargo-passenger liners nicknamed the Four Aces.

Union Iron Works shipbuilding firm in San Francisco

Union Iron Works, located in San Francisco, California, on the southeast waterfront, was a central business within the large industrial zone of Potrero Point, for four decades at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries.

Sister ship

A sister ship is a ship of the same class or of virtually identical design to another ship. Such vessels share a nearly identical hull and superstructure layout, similar size, and roughly comparable features and equipment. They often share a common naming theme, either being named after the same type of thing or with some kind of alliteration. Often, sisters become more differentiated during their service as their equipment are separately altered.

<i>Destiny</i>-class cruise ship ship class

The Destiny class is a class of cruise ships owned by Carnival Cruise Line. The class was modified after the lead ship, Carnival Destiny, was launched. This is reflected in both Carnival Triumph and Carnival Victory.

Under United Nations Security Council Resolution 678, a coalition of 35 countries, led by the United States, fought Iraq in the Gulf War from 1990–1991.

Eight ships of the French Navy have borne the name Le Triomphant ("triumphant"):

RIM-67 Standard An extended range surface-to-air missile

The RIM-67 Standard ER (SM-1ER/SM-2ER) is an extended range surface-to-air missile (SAM) and anti ship missile originally developed for the United States Navy (USN). The RIM-67 was developed as a replacement for the RIM-8 Talos, a 1950s system deployed on a variety of USN ships, and eventually replaced the RIM-2 Terrier as well, since it was of a similar size and fitted existing Terrier launchers and magazines. The RIM-66 Standard MR was essentially the same missile without the booster stage, designed to replace the RIM-24 Tartar. The RIM-66/67 series thus became the US Navy's universal SAM system, hence the "Standard Missile" moniker.

<i>Submarine</i> (Clancy book) non-fiction book

Submarine: A Guided Tour Inside a Nuclear Warship is a non-fiction book written by Tom Clancy and defense systems analyst John D. Gresham. Released on November 1, 1993, it is the first entry in Clancy's Guided Tour series of non-fiction books, which explore several different facets of the United States military. Submarine particularly explores the inner workings of two submarines, USS Miami and HMS Triumph.