United States Attorney for the District of New York

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The U.S. Attorney for the District of New York was from 1789 to 1815 the chief federal law enforcement officer in the federal judicial District of New York, which at that time was coterminous with the whole State of New York. In 1814, the District of New York was split into the Northern and the Southern District, and in 1815 the first U.S. Attorneys were appointed for the new districts.

New York (state) State of the United States of America

New York, officially the State of New York, is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original Thirteen Colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. To distinguish the state from the city in the state with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State.

United States Attorney for the Northern District of New York

The United States Attorney for the Northern District of New York is the chief federal law enforcement officer in 32 counties in the northern part of the State of New York. The current acting U.S. Attorney is Grant C. Jaquith who was named on July 1, 2017.

United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York

The United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York is the chief federal law enforcement officer in eight New York counties: New York (Manhattan), Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess and Sullivan.

The U.S. District Court for the District of New York had jurisdiction over all cases prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney.

List of U.S. Attorneys for the District of New York

Richard Harison American politician

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Nathan Sanford was an American politician.

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