Vella Flat

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Vella Flat ( 78°11′S166°14′E / 78.183°S 166.233°E / -78.183; 166.233 Coordinates: 78°11′S166°14′E / 78.183°S 166.233°E / -78.183; 166.233 ) is a coastal flat to the south of Lake Cole in the northwest part of Black Island, Ross Archipelago. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) (1999) after Professor Paul Vella, Department of Geology, Victoria University of Wellington, who made a reconnaissance survey of Brown Peninsula and Black Island stratigraphy with the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition (VUWAE), 1964–65.

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