Video clip

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Video clips are short clips of video, usually part of a longer recording. The term is also more loosely used to mean any short video less than the length of a traditional television program.

Contents

On the Internet

With the spread of Internet global accessing (fastest Internet broadband connection TCP with accumulator cables[ clarification needed ] and semi-fast connection), video clips have become very popular online. By mid-2006 there were tens of millions of video clips available online, with new websites springing up focusing entirely on offering free video clips to users and many established and corporate sites adding video clip content to their websites. With the spread of broadband Internet access, video clips have become very popular online. Whereas most of this content is non-exclusive and available on competing sites, some companies produce all their own videos and do not rely on the work of outside companies or amateurs.

A detailed icon for video e.g. to link to video content on a website Video icon2.png
A detailed icon for video e.g. to link to video content on a website

While some video clips are taken from established media sources, community or individual produced clips are becoming more common. Some individuals host their created works on vlogs, which are video blogs. The use of Internet video is growing very fast. Between March and July 2006, YouTube grew from 30 to 100 million views of videos per day. [1] More recent developments includes the BBC's iPlayer, which was released for open beta testing in July 2007.

Clip culture

The widespread popularity of video clips, with the aid of new distribution channels, has evolved into 'clip '. It is compared to 'lean-back' experience of seeing traditional movies, refers to the Internet activity of sharing and viewing a very short video, mostly less than 15 minutes. The culture began with the development of broadband Internet service, and has seen a boom since 2005 when websites for uploading clips first started, including Shockinghumor, YouTube, Google Video, MSN Video and Yahoo! Video.[ citation needed ]

Such video clips often show moments of significance, humour, oddity, or prodigy performance. Sources for video clips include news, movies, music video and amateur video shot. In addition to clips recorded by high-quality camcorders, it has become more common to produce clips with digital cameras, webcams, and mobile phones.

Advertising

Online video advertising is used by advertisers. With online entertainment sites delivering high-quality television programming content free of charge, online video entertainment is rising in popularity.

With consumer attention came advertisers. MAGNA estimated that online video advertisement spending will approach nearly US$700 million in 2008, a 32% increase from 2008. [2] As businesses seek to tighten budgetary allocations, online video is a highly measurable and results-driven delivery platform.

Rise of amateurs

Unlike traditional movies largely dominated by studios, clip movies are overwhelmingly supplied by amateurs. In May 2006, The Economist reported that 90% of clips on YouTube came from amateurs, a few of whom are young comedians. It, in effect, also brought amateur talents. In 2005, two Chinese students Huang Yixin and Wei Wei, now dubbed as "Back Dorm Boys", lip-synched to a song by the Backstreet Boys in a video uploaded to some clip websites and became quickly renowned. They appeared on television shows and concerts, and were also granted a contract by a media company in Beijing for lip-syncing. [3]

An earlier celebrity was David Elsewhere, a talent at popping and liquiding. His performance to Kraftwerk's song Expo 2000 at the Kollaboration talent show in 2001 was widely viewed on the Internet, leading later to his being hired for TV commercials and music videos. Not only have video clips submerged into the world of TV commercials and music videos but it is now also a popular form of entertainment and a hobby for people called "Vloggers" (video blog creators). Many professional video bloggers can be found on the Internet; additionally many notable amateur video bloggers have also emerged.

Citizen journalism

Citizen journalism video reporting dates back as early as the development of camcorders, but all videos were screened by the local media outlets of the time, until its spread has been aided by free upload websites in which censorship is limited to make a vast number of videos available to anyone who wants it. Scenes rarely broadcast on television, and many first-witnessed scenes have since become publicly available.

Notably, in December 2004, tourist videos of the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami offered worldwide audiences the first scenes of the disaster. In December 2003, videos in Hong Kong showing the bully in De La Salle School outraged the public and raised a wide concern on school violence that led to the arrest of 11 students.[ citation needed ]

Vlog

From late 2005 to early 2006, a new form of blogging emerged called a vlog. [4] [5] [6] It is a blog that takes video as the primary content, often accompanied by supporting text, image, and additional metadata to provide context. Su Li Walker, an analyst with the Yankee Group, said that like blogs, which have become an extension of traditional media, video blogs will be a supplement to traditional broadcasting. [7] [8] Regular entries are typically presented in reverse chronological order and often combine embedded video or a video link with supporting text, images, and metadata.

Convergence with traditional media

The potential markets of video clips has caught the attention of traditional movie studios. In 2006, the producers of Lucky Number Slevin , a film with Morgan Freeman, Lucy Liu and Bruce Willis, made an 8-minute clip for YouTube. Celebrities in traditional media have proven to confer bigger popularity in clip culture.

The emerging potential for success in web video has caught the eye of some of the top entertainment executives in America, including former Disney executive and current head of the Tornante Company, Michael Eisner. Eisner's Vuguru subdivision of Tornante partnered with Canadian media conglomerate Rogers Media on October 26, 2009, securing plans to produce upwards of 30 new web shows a year. Rogers Media will help fund and distribute Vuguru's upcoming productions, thereby solidifying a direct connection between old and new media. [9]

Use of corporate web videos

Corporations have used Web video in communicating with people and in driving traffic to their sites. According to one article, the most common types of corporate Web video are:

See also

Related Research Articles

A blog is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries (posts). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual, occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) emerged, featuring the writing of multiple authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media. Blog can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.

Eric Eisner is the founder and CEO of Double E Pictures, and partner at The Tornante Company. He is the son of Disney magnate Michael Eisner and a producer.

Streaming television Distribution of television content via the public internet

Streaming television is the digital distribution of television content, such as TV shows, as streaming video delivered over the Internet. Streaming TV stands in contrast to dedicated terrestrial television delivered by over-the-air aerial systems, cable television, and/or satellite television systems.

A video blog or video log, usually shortened to vlog, is a form of blog for which the medium is video, and is a form of web television. Vlog entries often combine embedded video with supporting text, images, and other metadata. Entries can be recorded in one take or cut into multiple parts. Vlog category is popular on the video-sharing platform YouTube.

Citizen media media content produced by private citizens who are otherwise not professional journalists

The term citizen media refers to forms of content produced by private citizens who are otherwise not professional journalists. Citizen journalism, participatory media and democratic media are related principles.

Crooks and Liars is a liberal / progressive news blog focusing on political events and the news coverage of them, founded by John Amato. Karoli Kuns is the managing editor. Along with John Amato, frequent contributors include Susan Madrak, Nicole Belle, Logan Murphy, Mike Finnigan, David Neiwert, SilentPatriot, Fran Langum Nonny Mouse, Kenneth Quinnell, and Howie Klein.

A webisode is an episode of a series that is distributed as web television. It is available as either for download or in streaming, as opposed to first airing on broadcast or cable television. The format can be used as a preview, a promotion, as part of a collection of shorts, or a commercial. A webisode may or may not have been broadcast on TV. What defines it is its online distribution on the web, or through video-sharing web sites such as Vimeo or YouTube. While there is no set standard for length, most webisodes are relatively short, ranging from 3–15 minutes in length. It is a single web episode, but collectively is part of a web series, a form called web television that characteristically features a dramatic, serial storyline, where the primary method of viewership is streaming online over the Internet. The term webisode was first introduced in the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary in 2009.

Steve Garfield American video blogger

Steve Garfield is a videographer and video blogger based in Boston, Massachusetts. Known for shows such as New Mediacracy, in 2009 Garfield was inducted into the International Academy of Web Television.

Web television is original episodic content produced for broadcast via the Internet. The phrase "web television" is also sometimes used to refer to Internet television in general, which includes Internet-transmission of programs produced for both online and traditional terrestrial, cable, or satellite broadcast.

Vuguru

Vuguru is an American independent multi-platform studio founded by Michael Eisner's The Tornante Company in March 2006. The company has produced content including the web series Prom Queen, The Booth at the End, Little Women Big Cars, The All-for-Nots, and Back on Topps. The company has signed content deals with AOL, HDNet, Yahoo!, Hulu, YouTube, Stan Lee's POW! Entertainment, and FremantleMedia. Its shows are distributed in over forty countries, on the Internet, mobile phones, and linear television platforms.

Prom Queen is the first web television series produced by former Walt Disney CEO Michael Eisner's new production company Vuguru and veteran web television production company Big Fantastic, the creators of Sam Has 7 Friends. The series, consisting of 80 episodes of 90 seconds each, is one of the best-funded entrants into the world of original programming designed exclusively for online video.

A web series is a series of scripted or non-scripted videos, generally in episodic form, released on the Internet and part of the web television medium, which first emerged in the late 1990s and became more prominent in the early 2000s. A single instance of a web series program can be called an episode or "webisode", however the latter term is not often used. In general, web series can be watched on a range of platforms and devices, including desktop, laptop, tablets and smartphones. They can also be watched on television.

Porn 2.0, named after "Web 2.0", refers to pornographic websites featuring user-generated content. Sites may include social networking media including feature such as user-based categorizing, webcam hosting, blogs and comments. This is in contrast to the static content offered by "Web 1.0" porn sites. Porn 2.0 sites may offer features similar to mainstream Web 2.0 services such as video communities and social sites, general blogging, and photo hosting.

Larry Tanz is an American entertainment industry executive. He has held executive positions with AOL Time Warner, and previously served as president and CEO of LivePlanet, as well as the president and CEO of Vuguru. He is currently the VP of Global Television at Netflix.

Visual networking refers to an emerging class of user applications that combine digital video and social networking capabilities. It is based upon the premise that visual literacy, "the ability to interpret, negotiate and make meaning from information presented in the form of a moving image", is a powerful force in how humans communicate, entertain and learn. The duality of visual networking—subsuming entertainment and communications, professional and personal content, video and other digital media, data networks and social networks to create immersive experiences, when, where and how the user wants it. These applications have changed video content from long-form movies and broadcast television programming to a database of segments or "clips", and social network annotations. And the generation and distribution of content takes on a new dimension with Web 2.0 applications—participatory social-networks or communities that facilitate interactive creativity, collaboration and sharing between users.

Amateur pornography is a category of pornography that features models, actors or non-professionals performing without pay, or actors for whom this material is not their only paid modeling work. Reality pornography is professionally made porn which seeks to emulate the style of amateur pornography. Amateur porn has been called one of the most profitable and long-lasting genres of pornography.

MeFeedia.com is a media search website founded in 2004 that features videos, TV shows, movies, and music among other material. The chief executive officer of MeFeedia is Frank C. Sinton III. The web site's target audience is men 18-35. Mefeedia's name is derived from how it receives all content from user-submitted video RSS feeds from other sites and vlogs.

The Tornante Company, LLC is an American privately held investment firm founded and owned by former The Walt Disney Company CEO Michael Eisner in 2005. Tornante invests in, acquires and operate media and entertainment companies.

Online journalism in India is a growing field shared between traditional media and the growing blogging community. Large media companies, traditionally print and television focused, continue to dominate the journalism environment now online but a growing group of dedicated bloggers are providing an independent voice.

An online video platform (OVP), provided by a video hosting service, enables users to upload, convert, store and play back video content on the Internet, often via a structured, large-scale system that can generate revenue. Users generally will upload video content via the hosting service's website, mobile or desktop application, or other interface (API). The type of video content uploaded might be anything from shorts to full-length TV shows and movies. The video host stores the video on its server and offers users the ability to enable different types of embed codes or links that allow others to view the video content. The website, mainly used as the video hosting website, is usually called the video sharing website.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 28, 2007. Retrieved March 20, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "Hulu Shakes Up the Online Video Scene", eMarketer
  3. "Out of the dorm". The Economist. 2006-04-06. ISSN   0013-0613 . Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  4. Blip.tv Brings Vlogs to Masses Red Herring Archived May 7, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  5. Prime Time for Vlogs? CNNMoney.com
  6. Will video kill the blogging star? San Diego Union Tribune.
  7. Dean, Katie (13 July 2005). "Blogging + Video = Vlogging". Wired News . Condé Nast Publications . Retrieved 2 March 2007.
  8. Media Revolution: Podcasting New England Film Archived August 14, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  9. Eisner cuts deal for Web shows

Further reading