Wild Women

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Wild Women
1918 - Wild Women (1918).jpeg
Poster for film
Directed by John Ford
Produced by Harry Carey
Written byHarry Carey
John Ford
George Hively
Starring Harry Carey
CinematographyJohn W. Brown
Ben F. Reynolds
Distributed byUniversal Film Manufacturing Company
Release date
  • February 25, 1918 (1918-02-25)
Running time
50 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

Wild Women is a 1918 American comedy western film directed by John Ford and featuring Harry Carey. The film is considered to be lost. [1]

Western (genre) Multimedia genre of stories set primarily in the American Old West

Western is a genre of fiction incorporating Western lifestyle which tell stories set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, neckerchief bandannas, vests, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Recurring characters include the aforementioned cowboys, Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, gamblers, soldiers, and settlers. The ambience is usually punctuated with a Western music score, including American and Mexican folk music such as country, Native American music, New Mexico music, and rancheras.

John Ford American film director

John Ford was an American film director. He is renowned both for Westerns such as Stagecoach (1939), The Searchers (1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), as well as adaptations of classic 20th-century American novels such as the film The Grapes of Wrath (1940). His four Academy Awards for Best Director remain a record. One of the films for which he won the award, How Green Was My Valley, also won Best Picture.

Lost film Feature or short film that is no longer known to exist

A lost film is a feature or short film that is no longer known to exist in any studio archives, private collections, or public archives, such as the U.S. Library of Congress.

Contents

Plot

As described in a film magazine, [2] Cheyenne Harry (Carey) and his pals, bent on helping their friend Rawhide Jack, attend a rodeo with the intent to win the prize for roping steers and to hand the winnings over to Jack. Harry wins, and after the rodeo the boys go to a cafe where they imbibe too freely in the flowing wine and fall asleep. Harry finds himself robbed and with the others shanghaied and aboard a ship. They mutiny and Harry becomes the captain. A shipboard fire results in them landing on a desert island, where the Queen (Mattox) of the Blackanwhites falls in love with Harry. He dodges her and runs off with her daughter the Princess (Malone). Just as he starts making love to her, he awakens from a dream, the product of Harry's legendarily prodigious drinking, and discovers that he is holding one of the sleeping cowboys.

Cast

Martha Mattox American actress

Martha Mattox was an American silent film actor most notable for her role of Mammy Pleasant in the 1927 film The Cat and the Canary. She also played a role in Torrent (1926). She died from a heart ailment at age 53.

Vester Pegg was an American actor of the silent film era. He appeared in 140 films between 1912 and 1941, mainly Westerns. He was born in Appleton City, Missouri and died in Los Angeles, California.

Wilton Taylor American actor

Wilton Taylor was an American stage and silent screen actor. He usually played gruff men of authority like wardens, judges or the police commissioner in Tod Browning's Outside the Law (1920). Of some other surviving silent he can be seen in Houdini's Terror Island (1920). Prior to entering films he spent some years on the stage and appeared as a police inspector in the original 1912 Broadway production of Within the Law starring Jane Cowl. Taylor died in January 1925.

Production

Wild Women was a Universal Special release in February 1918. It was a silent film on five reels, part of the Western-themed "Cheyenne Harry" series of film featurettes. [3]

Silent film Film with no synchronized recorded dialogue

A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound. In silent films for entertainment, the plot may be conveyed by the use of title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube and the advent of the Vitaphone system.

In the American film industry, a featurette is a kind of film which is shorter than a full-length feature, but longer than a short film. They comprise two forms of content, shorter films and companion films.

Reception

Like many American films of the time, Wild Women was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required cuts in Reel 2 of the three first scenes of the young woman dancing on the stage and two closeups of young woman dancing on a table. [4]

Film censorship in the United States

Film censorship in the United States was a frequent feature of the industry since almost the beginning of the motion picture industry until the end of strong self-regulation in 1966. Court rulings in the 1950s and 1960s severely constrained government censorship, though statewide regulation lasted until at least the 1980s.

See also

John Ford filmography

John Ford (1894–1973) was an American film director whose career spanned from 1913 to 1971. During this time he directed more than 140 films. Born in Maine, Ford entered the filmmaking industry shortly after graduating from high school with the help of his older brother, Francis Ford, who had established himself as a leading man and director for Universal Studios. After working as an actor, assistant director, stuntman, and prop man – often for his brother – Universal gave Ford the opportunity to direct in 1917. Initially working in short films, he quickly moved into features, largely with Harry Carey as his star. In 1920 Ford left Universal and began working for the Fox Film Corporation. During the next ten years he directed more than 30 films, including the westerns The Iron Horse (1924) and 3 Bad Men (1926), both starring George O'Brien, the war drama Four Sons and the Irish romantic drama Hangman's House. In the same year of these last two films, Ford directed his first all-talking film, the short Napoleon's Barber. The following year he directed his first all-talking feature, The Black Watch.

Harry Carey filmography Filmography

This is a list of films featuring Harry Carey.

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References

  1. "Progressive Silent Film List: Wild Women". silentera.com. Retrieved March 1, 2008.
  2. "Reviews: Wild Women". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 6 (11): 25. March 9, 1918.
  3. Gallagher, Tag (1986); John Ford: The Man and His Films ; University of California Press. p. 505.
  4. "Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors". Exhibitors Herald. 6 (13): 29. March 23, 1918.