Agility

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Material to exercise the balance agility for children Matten13.jpg
Material to exercise the balance agility for children

Agility or nimbleness is an ability to change the body's position efficiently, and requires the integration of isolated movement skills using a combination of balance, coordination, speed, reflexes, strength and endurance. Agility is the ability to change the direction of the body in an efficient and effective manner and to achieve this requires a combination of

In sports, agility is often defined in terms of an individual sport, due to it being an integration of many components each used differently (specific to all of sorts of different sports). Sheppard and Young (2006) defined agility as a "rapid whole body movement with change of velocity or direction in response to a stimulus". [1]

Agility is also an important attribute in many role playing games, both video games such as Pokémon, and tabletop games such as Dungeons & Dragons . Agility may affect the character's ability to evade an enemy's attack or land their own, or pickpocket and pick locks.

In modern-day psychology, author, psychologist, and executive coach Susan David introduces a concept that she terms “emotional agility,” defined as: “being flexible with your thoughts and feelings so that you can respond optimally to everyday situations.” [2] [3]

The concept has also been applied to higher education management and leadership, where it was used to accelerate slower traditional and deliberative processes and to replace them with corporate decision making. [4]

See also

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References

  1. J. M. Sheppard; W.B. Young (September 2006), "Agility literature review: classifications, training and testing", Journal of Sports Sciences, 24 (9): 919–932, doi:10.1080/02640410500457109, PMID   16882626, S2CID   25145679
  2. Dell’Antonia, K. J. (2016-10-04). "Teaching Your Child Emotional Agility". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2019-06-26.
  3. Orlov, Francoise (2017-05-01). "Book Review. Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life by Susan David". Philosophy of Coaching. 2 (1): 52–54. doi: 10.22316/poc/02.1.06 .
  4. Richard Utz, "Against Adminspeak," Chronicle of Higher Education, June 24, 2020.