Attainders of Earl of Westmorland and others Act 1571

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Attainders of Earl of Westmorland and others Act 1571 was an Act of Parliament of the Parliament of England (13 Eliz.1 c.16) which confirmed the attainder against Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland and 57 others for their part in the Rising of the North, a plot against Queen Elizabeth I.

An act of parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature). Act of the Oireachtas is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland where the legislature is commonly known by its Irish name, Oireachtas. The United States Act of Congress is based on it.

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it united with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime. It entailed losing not only one's life, property and hereditary titles, but typically also the right to pass them on to one's heirs. Both men and women condemned of capital crimes could be attainted.

It was repealed by section 1(1) of, and Part 4 of Schedule 1 to, the Statute Law (Repeals) Act 1977 (c.18).

Statute Law (Repeals) Act 1977 United Kingdom legislation

The Statute Law (Repeals) Act 1977 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

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