Cakraningrat IV

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Cakraningrat IV was a ruling prince (1718-1745) from West Madura, [1] and a member of the Cakraningrat dynasty which was the subordinate ruler of the Mataram Sultanate. [2] [3]

During his reign, he tried to expand his authority to include all Madura Island and East Java region. [1] [3] He alternated alliances with Mataram and the Dutch East India Company, and even separately battled the two forces in an effort to realize his goal. [1] [2] However, in 1746 he lost the final war against Mataram which then had allied with the Company, and he was later banished to the Cape of Good Hope until his death. [2] [3]

From then on, the West Madura region was ceded over by Mataram to the Dutch East India Company as an exchange for the costs of the war. [2] [3] His son, Cakraningrat V, was put in his place as the Company's vassal. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Ricklefs, Merle (2018). Soul Catcher: Java’s Fiery Prince Mangkunagara I, 1726-95. NUS Press. ISBN   9789814722841.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Ricklefs, M. C. (2008). A History of Modern Indonesia since c.1200. Macmillan International Higher Education. ISBN   9781137149183.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Choy, Lee Khoon (1999-06-02). Fragile Nation, A: The Indonesian Crisis. World Scientific. ISBN   9789814494526.
Preceded by
Cakraningrat III
Prince of West Madura
1718-1745 CE
Succeeded by
Cakraningrat V