Cephalothorax

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Bauplan of a malacostracan; the cephalothorax is the region including cephalon and thorax, marked in yellow. General malacostracan en.svg
Bauplan of a malacostracan; the cephalothorax is the region including cephalon and thorax, marked in yellow.

The cephalothorax, also called prosoma in some groups, is a tagma of various arthropods, comprising the head and the thorax fused together, as distinct from the abdomen behind. [1] (The terms prosoma and opisthosoma are equivalent to cephalothorax and abdomen in some groups.) The word cephalothorax is derived from the Greek words for head ( κεφαλή , kephalé) and thorax (θώραξ, thórax ). [2] This fusion of the head and thorax is seen in chelicerates and crustaceans; in other groups, such as the Hexapoda (including insects), the head remains free of the thorax. [1] In horseshoe crabs and many crustaceans, a hard shell called the carapace covers the cephalothorax. [3]

Contents

Arachnid anatomy

Fovea

The fovea is the centre of the cephalothorax and is located behind the head (only in spiders). [4] It is often important in identification. It can be transverse or procurved [5] and can, in some tarantulas (e.g. Ceratogyrus darlingi ) have a "horn". [6]

Clypeus

The clypeus is the space between the anterior of the cephalothorax and the ocularium. It is found in most arachnids. [5] It is connected to the labrum of the invertebrate, between the labrum and the face.

Ocularium

The ocularium is a "turret" for the ocelli found in most arachnids. [7] In harvestmen, it may have the ornament of spines. [8]

Trident

The trident is a small group of (usually three) spines found in harvestmen exclusively. It is located in front of the ocularium. It varies in size amongst species; in some it is completely absent, and in others it is enlarged considerably. [8]

Related Research Articles

Chelicerata subphylum of arthropods

The subphylum Chelicerata constitutes one of the major subdivisions of the phylum Arthropoda. It contains the sea spiders, arachnids, and several extinct lineages, such as the eurypterids.

Arachnid Class of arthropods

Arachnida is a class of joint-legged invertebrate animals (arthropods), in the subphylum Chelicerata. Spiders are the largest order in the class, which also includes scorpions, ticks, mites, harvestmen, and solifuges. In 2019, a molecular phylogenetic study also placed horseshoe crabs in Arachnida.

Opiliones Order of arachnids (harvestmen/daddy longlegs)

The Opiliones are an order of arachnids colloquially known as harvestmen, harvesters, or daddy longlegs. As of April 2017, over 6,650 species of harvestmen have been discovered worldwide, although the total number of extant species may exceed 10,000. The order Opiliones includes five suborders: Cyphophthalmi, Eupnoi, Dyspnoi, Laniatores, and Tetrophthalmi, which were named in 2014.

Chelicerae The mouthparts of spiders and horseshoe crabs

The chelicerae are the mouthparts of the Chelicerata, an arthropod group that includes arachnids, horseshoe crabs, and sea spiders. Commonly referred to as "jaws," chelicerae may be shaped as either articulated fangs, or similarly to pincers. Some chelicerae, such as those found on nearly all spiders, are hollow and contain venom glands, and are used to inject venom into prey or a (perceived) threat.

Solifugae order of animals in the class Arachnida

Solifugae is an order of animals in the class Arachnida known variously as camel spiders, wind scorpions, sun spiders, or solifuges. The order includes more than 1,000 described species in about 153 genera. Despite the common names, they are neither true scorpions nor true spiders. Much like a spider, the body of a solifugid has two tagmata: an opisthosoma, or abdomen, behind the prosoma, or cephalothorax. At the front end, the prosoma bears two chelicerae that, in most species, are conspicuously large. The chelicerae serve as jaws and in many species also are used for stridulation. Unlike scorpions, solifugids do not have a third tagma that forms a "tail". Most species of Solifugae live in dry climates and feed opportunistically on ground-dwelling arthropods and other small animals. The largest species grow to a length of 12–15 cm (5–6 in), including legs. A number of urban legends exaggerate the size and speed of the Solifugae, and their potential danger to humans, which is negligible.

Carapace part of exoskeleton in some animals

A carapace is a dorsal (upper) section of the exoskeleton or shell in a number of animal groups, including arthropods, such as crustaceans and arachnids, as well as vertebrates, such as turtles and tortoises. In turtles and tortoises, the underside is called the plastron.

Xiphosura Order of marine chelicerates

Xiphosura is an order of arthropods related to arachnids, or, according to one recent study, actual arachnids. They are sometimes called horseshoe crabs. They first appeared in the Hirnantian. Currently, there are only four living species. They are members of the order Xiphosura, which contains two suborders, Xiphosurida and Synziphosurina.

Decapod anatomy The entire structure of a decapod crustacean

The decapod crustacean, such as a crab, lobster, shrimp or prawn, is made up of 20 body segments grouped into two main body parts, the cephalothorax and the pleon (abdomen). Each segment may possess one pair of appendages, although in various groups these may be reduced or missing. They are, from head to tail:

In biology, a tagma is a specialized grouping of multiple segments or metameres into a coherently functional morphological unit. Familiar examples are the head, the thorax, and the abdomen of insects. The segments within a tagma may be either fused or so jointed as to be independently moveable.

Sternum (arthropod anatomy)

The sternum is the ventral portion of a segment of an arthropod thorax or abdomen.

Opisthosoma Wikimedia disambiguation page

The opisthosoma is the posterior part of the body in some arthropods, behind the prosoma (cephalothorax). It is a distinctive feature of the subphylum Chelicerata. Although it is similar in most respects to an abdomen, the opisthosoma is differentiated by its inclusion of the respiratory organs and the heart.

Spider anatomy type anatomy

The anatomy of spiders includes many characteristics shared with other arachnids. These characteristics include bodies divided into two tagmata, eight jointed legs, no wings or antennae, the presence of chelicerae and pedipalps, simple eyes, and an exoskeleton, which is periodically shed.

Mandible (arthropod mouthpart) Pair of mouthparts used either for biting or cutting and holding food

The mandible of an arthropod is a pair of mouthparts used either for biting or cutting and holding food. Mandibles are often simply referred to as jaws. Mandibles are present in the extant subphyla Myriapoda, Crustacea and Hexapoda. These groups make up the clade Mandibulata, which is currently believed to be the sister group to the rest of arthropods, the clade Arachnomorpha.

Opiliones anatomy

Opiliones are an order of arachnids and share many common characteristics with other arachnids. However, several differences separate harvestmen from other arachnid orders such as spiders. The bodies of opiliones are divided into two tagmata : the abdomen (opisthosoma) and the cephalothorax (prosoma). Unlike spiders, the juncture between the abdomen and cephalothorax is often poorly defined. Harvestmen have chelicerae, pedipalps and four pairs of legs. Most harvestmen have two eyes, although there are eyeless species.

Tarantula Family of spiders

Tarantulas comprise a group of large and often ″hairy″ spiders belonging to the family Theraphosidae. Currently, about 1,000 species have been identified. The term tarantula is usually used to describe members of the family Theraphosidae, although many other members of the same infraorder (Mygalomorphae) are commonly referred to as "tarantulas" or "false tarantulas". Some of the more common species have become popular in the exotic pet trade. Many New World species kept as pets have urticating hairs that can cause irritation to the skin, and in extreme cases, cause damage to the eyes.

Arthropod Phylum of invertebrates with jointed exoskeletons

An arthropod is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton, a segmented body, and paired jointed appendages. Arthropods form the phylum Euarthropoda, which includes insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans. The term Arthropoda as originally proposed refers to a proposed grouping of Euarthropods and the phylum Onychophora.

Spider Order of arachnids

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs, chelicerae with fangs able to inject venom, and spinnerets that extrude silk. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. As of July 2019, at least 48,200 spider species, and 120 families have been recorded by taxonomists. However, there has been dissension within the scientific community as to how all these families should be classified, as evidenced by the over 20 different classifications that have been proposed since 1900.

This glossary describes the terms used in formal descriptions of spiders; where applicable these terms are used in describing other arachnids.

Crustacean Subphylum of arthropods

Crustaceans form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles. The crustacean group can be treated as a subphylum under the clade Mandibulata; because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the clade Pancrustacea other than hexapods. Some crustaceans are more closely related to insects and other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans.

References

  1. 1 2 Eldra Pearl Solomon, Linda R. Berg & Diana W. Martin (2004). "The animal kingdom: an introduction to animal diversity". Biology (7th ed.). Cengage Learning. pp. 534–549. ISBN   978-0-534-49276-2.
  2. Timothy J. Gibb & C. Y. Oseto (2006). "Glossary". Arthropod Collection and Identification: Field and Laboratory Techniques. Academic Press. ISBN   978-0-12-369545-1.
  3. Andrew J. Martinez (2003). "Arthropoda (crabs, shrimps, lobsters)". Marine Life of the North Atlantic: Canada to New England (3rd ed.). Aqua Quest Publications. pp. 144–175. ISBN   978-1-881652-32-8.
  4. Dalton, Steve (2008). Spiders; The Ultimate Predators. A & C Black, London. P.p. 19. ISBN   9781408106976.
  5. 1 2 Smith, A. M. (1990c). Baboon spiders: Tarantulas of Africa and the Middle East. Fitzgerald Publishing, London, pp. 138. Retrieved February 13, 2016.
  6. Gallon, R.C. (2008). "On some poorly known African Harpactirinae, with notes on Avicuscodra arabica Strand, 1908 and Scodra pachypoda Strand, 1908 (Araneae, Theraphosidae)". Bulletin of the British Arachnological Society. 14: 238.
  7. Spiders... Yorkshire Naturalists Union. Retrieved February 13, 2016.
  8. 1 2 Sankey, John & Savory, Theodore. British Harvestmen. Academic Press. P.p. 1-75. ISBN   012619050X.