Convention of Alkmaar

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The Convention of Alkmaar was a 18 October 1799 agreement concluded between the commanders of the expeditionary forces of Great Britain and Russia on the one hand, and of those of the First French Republic and the Batavian Republic on the other, in the Dutch city of Alkmaar, by which the British and Russians agreed to withdraw their forces from the Batavian Republic following the failed Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland. [1] The Russian and British forces under the Duke of York were transported back to Britain in the weeks after the Convention was signed. [2]

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Text of the Convention

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References

  1. Harvey p.333-34
  2. Intelligence Division, p. 40
  3. This was to be then-lieutenant-colonel Krayenhoff; Krayenhoff, p. 239
  4. Admiral Jan Willem de Winter who had been captured at the Battle of Camperdown, but had already been paroled at the end of 1797.
  5. Intelligence Division, pp. 40–41; Krayenhoff, pp. 231–234

Bibliography