Dave Lemonds

Last updated
Dave Lemonds
Pitcher
Born: (1948-07-05) July 5, 1948 (age 69)
Charlotte, North Carolina
Batted: LeftThrew: Left
MLB debut
June 30, 1969, for the Chicago Cubs
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1972, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Win-Loss record 4–8
Earned run average 2.99
Innings 99⅓
Teams

David Lee Lemonds (born July 5, 1948) is an American former professional baseball player, a left-handed pitcher who played in the Major Leagues in 1969 and 1972 for the Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox. Lemonds appeared in 33 Major League games, all but two of them for the 1972 White Sox. He started 19 games, and in 99⅓ innings recorded 69 strikeouts and allowed 92 hits and 43 bases on balls. He retired after the 1974 minor league baseball season.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Professional baseball is played in leagues throughout the world. In these leagues and associated farm teams, baseball players are selected for their talents and are paid to play for a specific team or club system.

Pitcher the player responsible for throwing ("pitching") the ball to the batters in a game of baseball or softball

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and the closer.

Lemonds played on the Charlotte Post 9 (American Legion) team that advanced to back to back championship games, in 1964 and 65. Post 9, coached by his father Jack, won the Legion national championship in 1965.

Lemonds, then went on to play for the University of North Carolina, where he was named first team All American, and Sporting News Player of the Year in 1968. UNC retired his number.


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