Descendant (2003 film)

Last updated
Descendant
Descendant poster.jpg
Directed by Kermit Christman
Del Tenney
Written by Kermit Christman (screenplay)
Margot Hartman
Based on The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
Starring Jeremy London
Katherine Heigl
Arie Verveen
Release date
June 17, 2003
Running time
86 minutes
LanguageEnglish
Budget$650,000 (estimated)

Descendant is a 2003 film starring Katherine Heigl and Jeremy London based on the 1839 short story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. [1]

Contents

Plot

Ethan Poe, a writer living in the shadow of his infamous ancestor, is under deadline to finish his next book. He moves to a small town to concentrate on his novel and meets Anne who falls for the troubled writer. When the shadow of Poe's ghost falls over the two lovers women turn up murdered in Poe-etic fashion. Ethan is the Police's prime suspect. Is Anne next to be murdered? Can she save herself from the dark curse on the Poe family? [2]

Cast

Related Research Articles

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"The Fall of the House of Usher" is a short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1839 in Burton's Gentleman's Magazine, then included in the collection Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque in 1840. The short story, a work of Gothic fiction, includes themes of madness, family, isolation, and metaphysical identities.

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References

  1. "Descendant 2003". Garth Typepad. United States. January 23, 2016. Retrieved July 6, 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Descendant, dir. Kermit Christman and Del Tenney, perf. Katherine Heigl and Jeremy London, DVD, York Horror, 2003.