Fleet Marine Force insignia

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The Fleet Marine Force Warfare Insignia, also known as the Fleet Marine Force badge or FMF pin, are three military badges of the United States Navy which are issued to those U.S. Navy officers and sailors who are trained and qualified to perform duties in support of the United States Marine Corps. There are currently three classes of the Fleet Marine Force pin, being that of enlisted, officer, and chaplain.

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Enlisted

Fleet Marine Force Enlisted Warfare Specialist Device
Fleet Marine Force Enlisted Warfare Specialist Device.svg
The Fleet Marine Force Enlisted Warfare Specialist Device (FMFEWS) consists of a silver metal device depicting the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor of the U.S. Marine Corps, atop two crossed rifles on a background of ocean swells breaking on a sandy beach and a scroll with the words "FLEET MARINE FORCE".
Armiger U.S. Department of the Navy
AdoptedJuly 2000 (2000-07) [1] [2] [3]
Blazon Eagle, Globe, and Anchor
Motto FLEET MARINE FORCE
Earlier version(s) Fleet Marine Force ribbon
UseTo denote those enlisted U.S. Navy sailors who have completed the requirements of the Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist (EFMFWS) Program per OPNAV Instruction 1414.4B.
The FMF pin worn embroidered on a navy corpsman's shirt in July 2002 US Navy 020725-N-2338M-001 A Navy Corpsman examines a patient during the NATO joint training exercise Medical Central Europe 2002 (MEDCEUR 02).jpg
The FMF pin worn embroidered on a navy corpsman's shirt in July 2002
A corpsman in March 2012 wearing the FMFEWS on a MARPAT uniform. 120316-M-3612M-004 - HM3 (FMF) Sinthia M. Gomez works on dental records.jpg
A corpsman in March 2012 wearing the FMFEWS on a MARPAT uniform.
A corpsman in June 2012 wearing the FMFEWS on the NSU. HM1 (FMF-SW) Luis E. Fonseca, Jr., USN.jpg
A corpsman in June 2012 wearing the FMFEWS on the NSU.

The Fleet Marine Force Enlisted Warfare Specialist Device (FMFEWS) is a qualification insignia of the United States Navy earned by enlisted U.S. Navy sailors assigned to the Fleet Marine Force of the U.S. Marine Corps who have successfully completed the requirements of the Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist (EFMFWS) Program per OPNAV Instruction 1414.4B. This involves serving one year with a Marine Corps unit (two years for reserves), passing the Marine Physical Fitness Test (PFT), a written test, demonstrating skills used in service with the Marines such as weapon breakdown and familiarization, land navigation, combat communications and an oral examination by senior enlisted sailors who are FMF qualified. The Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist designation is most commonly awarded to the hospital corpsman (HM) and religious program specialist (RP) ratings, although it is also awarded to other sailors who support Marine Corps commands (e.g. Logistics Specialists assigned to medical logistics companies).

An enlisted U.S. Navy sailor who has qualified, may place the designator (FMF) after his or her rate and/or rate; for example, HM3 John Doe, USN, having qualified for his FMF pin, is identified as HM3 (FMF) John Doe, USN. As of 2004, all U.S. Navy corpsmen assigned to a Marine unit are required to earn the FMF badge within 18 months of their being assigned to said unit.

Enlisted requirements

When qualifying for the Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare specialist pin, a hospital corpsman, religious programs specialist, personnel specialist, along with some construction battalion "SeaBee" units (when directly assigned to a U.S. Marine Corps combatant command) are required to have detailed knowledge on the following subjects:

CORE

Additionally a second section of the course is detailed toward the element of the United States Marine Corps with which the candidate is assigned. For example: a line corpsman with an infantry battalion will learn the Ground Combat Element (GCE).

GCE

[4]

Furthermore, to finally qualify, a candidate is expected to perform a disassembly and reassembly of many of the taught weapon systems, operate a SINGARS radio, and plot various points on a map, perform various carries and life saving medical techniques, and in many cases perform (and pass) a Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test(PFT) and Combat Fitness Test (CFT)

Although this is a qualification is for enlisted personnel serving in the United States Navy, it is unique in that only Commanding Generals or Commanding Officers of qualifying U.S. Marine Corps commands, Division, Group, or Wing; can approve awarding of the designation. As such, to some corpsmen it is the most coveted warfare insignia within the hospital corpsman community.

The eagle, globe, and anchor (EGA) makes a clear statement that the wearer is a member of the Navy/Marine Corps team. The crossed rifles symbolize the rifleman ethic of the Marine Corps; every Marine is a rifleman, just as every Sailor is a firefighter and damage controlman aboard ship and submarine. The surf and sand represent the "littoral zone," the coastal regions where sailors have served alongside Marines as they earned their reputation and world's respect -- "the shores of Tripoli" and the "sands of Iwo Jima." And has a scroll at the bottom stating "Fleet Marine Force" showing the exclusive community they belong to.

Officer

A highly polished gold and silver metal device depicting the eagle, globe and anchor atop two crossed rifles on a background of ocean swells breaking on a sandy beach and a scroll with the words "FLEET MARINE FORCE". USN - Fleet Marine Force Officer Insignia.png
A highly polished gold and silver metal device depicting the eagle, globe and anchor atop two crossed rifles on a background of ocean swells breaking on a sandy beach and a scroll with the words "FLEET MARINE FORCE".

The Fleet Marine Force Warfare Officer (FMFWO) Insignia is earned by Navy officers assigned to the Fleet Marine Force of the U.S. Marine Corps who have completed the requirements including serving for one year in a Marine Corps command, completing a written test, passing the Marine PFT, and an oral board conducted by FMF qualified officers. The FMF Qualified Officer Insignia is most commonly earned by staff officers in the medical fields, and chaplains, although it is also awarded to other officer communities, such as Civil Engineer Corps and naval gunfire officers.

The FMFWO insignia is a gold, highly polished, metal device depicting the eagle, globe and anchor (EGA) atop two crossed rifles on a background of ocean swells breaking on a sandy beach atop a scroll with the words "Fleet Marine Force."

The EGA makes a clear statement that the wearer is a member of the Navy/Marine Corps team. The crossed rifles symbolize the rifleman ethic of the Marine Corps; every Marine is a rifleman, just as every Sailor is a firefighter and damagecontrolman aboard ship and submarine. The surf and sand represent the "littoral zone," the coastal regions where Sailors have served alongside Marines as they earned their reputation and world's respect -- "the shores of Tripoli" and the "sands of Iwo Jima." The eagle, continents, and rifles are highlighted with a highly polished silver finish. [5] The qualification was created in July 2005; SECNAVINST 1412.10 outlines the requirements for qualification.

Chaplain

USN - Fleet Marine Force Chaplain Insignia.png
See also: United States Navy Chaplain Corps § Chaplain and Chaplain Assistant Insignia and Religious symbolism in the United States military § Marine Corps and Coast Guard

Chaplains do not bear arms; therefore, they are designated as Fleet Marine Force Qualified Officers vice Fleet Marine Force Warfare Officers, and are waived from completing certain [weapons related] portions of the Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS). The Chaplain version of this badge does not include the crossed rifles and has a gold anodized finish. [6]

Fleet Marine Force Ribbon.svg

As a result of the Fleet Marine Force Qualified Officer and Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist programs, [7] the Navy Fleet Marine Force Ribbon was replaced effective October 1, 2006.

Those individuals who previously qualified for the Navy Fleet Marine Force Ribbon will retain the FMF designator; however, they are not entitled to wear the EFMFWS insignia until completing another FMF assignment and meeting all requirements outlined in OPNAVINST 1414.4B.

See also

Related Research Articles

Fleet Marine Force Ribbon

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The Enlisted Information Warfare Specialist Insignia (EIWS) is a military badge of the United States Navy which was created in 2010. The insignia recognizes those members of the Navy’s enlisted force who have acquired the specific professional skills, knowledge, and military experience that result in qualification for service in the information warfare activities of the Navy.

References

  1. "Fleet Marine Warfare Specialists: Marine Corps knowledge for a combat". 2ndmaw.marines.mil. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  2. "FMF Warfare Changes Affect Junior Sailors". Navy.mil. April 9, 2004. Retrieved February 24, 2017. [T]he first FMF instruction was signed back in 2001...
  3. "MCWP6-12v2001.pdf Preview". Booksmovie.org. Archived from the original on 2017-02-17. Retrieved 2017-02-16.
  4. 1 2 NAVEDTRA 43908-B Aug2010
  5. "SECNAV INSTRUCTION 1412.10" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 May 2015. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  6. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-07-22. Retrieved 2008-05-26.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Navy Uniform Regulations, Chapter 5 Section 2
  7. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-09-20. Retrieved 2007-11-08.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)