Giro del Belvedere

Last updated
Giro del Belvedere
Race details
DateApril
Region Treviso province
Discipline Road race
Competition UCI Europe Tour
TypeSingle day race
History
First edition1923 (1923)
Editions83 (as of 2022)
First winnerFlag of Italy.svg  Alfonso Piccin  (ITA)
Most winsFlag of Italy.svg  Claudio Zanchetta  (ITA)
Flag of Italy.svg  Mosè Segato  (ITA)
Flag of Italy.svg  Flavio Martini  (ITA)
(2 wins)
Most recentFlag of France.svg  Romain Grégoire  (FRA)

The Giro del Belvedere is a professional cycling race held annually in the Treviso province, Italy. It has been part of the UCI Europe Tour since 2005 in category 1.2U, meaning it is reserved for U23 riders.

Winners (since 2000)

YearCountryRiderTeam
2000Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Giampaolo Caruso Vellutex Zoccorinese Toscana
2001Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine Yaroslav Popovych Vellutex Record Cucine
2002Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Devid Garbelli Marchiol–Hit Casinos–Safi–Site–Frezza
2003Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Alexandre Bazhenov Cotto Ref
2004Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Claudio Corioni Egidio Unidelta
2005Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Gianluca Coletta Caneva Concrete–Cyberteam
2006Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Fabrizio Galeazzi Zalf–Désirée–Fior
2007Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Simone Stortoni Finauto Sport Team
2008Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Davide Malacarne Neri Lucchini Nuova Comauto
2009Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Sacha Modolo Zalf–Désirée–Fior
2010Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus Siarhei Papok Concrete San Marco Imet Caneva
2011Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Nicola Boem Zalf–Désirée–Fior
2012Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Daniele Dall'Oste U.C. Trevigiani–Dynamon–Bottoli
2013Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Stefan Küng BMC Development Team
2014Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Simone Andreetta Zalf–Euromobil–Désirée–Fior
2015Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Andrea Vendrame Zalf–Euromobil–Désirée–Fior
2016Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Patrick Müller BMC Development Team
2017Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus Aleksandr Riabushenko Team Palazzago
2018Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Robert Stannard Mitchelton–BikeExchange
2019Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Samuele Battistella Team Dimension Data
2020No race due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2021Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Juan Ayuso Team Colpack–Ballan
2022Flag of France.svg  France Romain Grégoire Groupama–FDJ Continental Team

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