Hern

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Hern is an English masculine given name meaning "mythical hunter". There are variants including the English Herne ("mythical hunter God"), associated with Herne the Hunter. Hern is also common as a surname, including the British Isles variant "A'hern" and the Irish variant "O'Hern". Recorded alternative spellings include Harn, Hearn, Hearne and Herne. People with the name Hern include: [1]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Male The sex of an organism which produces sperm

A male (♂) organism is the physiological sex that produces sperm. Each spermatozoon can fuse with a larger female gamete, or ovum, in the process of fertilization. A male cannot reproduce sexually without access to at least one ovum from a female, but some organisms can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most male mammals, including male humans, have a Y chromosome, which codes for the production of larger amounts of testosterone to develop male reproductive organs. Not all species share a common sex-determination system. In most animals, including humans, sex is determined genetically, but in some species it can be determined due to social, environmental, or other factors. For example, Cymothoa exigua changes sex depending on the number of females present in the vicinity.

Given name name typically used to differentiate people from the same family, clan, or other social group who have a common last name

A given name is a part of a person's personal name. It identifies a person, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group who have a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name usually is bestowed upon a person, normally to a child by their parents at or close to the time of birth. A Christian name, a first name which historically was given at baptism, is now also typically given by the parents at birth.

Contents

Hern
Gender Male
Origin
Word/name English language
Meaning"mythical hunter"
Region of origin England
Other names
Related names Herne

William Richard "Dick" Hern was an English Thoroughbred racehorse trainer and winner of sixteen British Classic Races between 1962 and 1995, and was Champion Trainer on four occasions.

Thomas Hern is a New Zealand Actor and award- winning independent Film Producer. He is known for producing NZ feature films, The Dark Horse, Everything We Loved and Pork Pie. He is also known to global audiences for his role as Ram in The Tribe and Devin Del Valle in the 2004 television show Power Rangers Dino Thunder. Hern also appeared in Shortland Street, Revelations, Interrogation, Maddigan's Quest, as well as in many smaller acting and presenting roles. His filmography also includes various TV and radio commercials and voiceovers.

Riley Hern ice hockey goaltender from Canada

William Milton "Riley" Hern was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender. He was the first professional goaltender to play on a Stanley Cup-winning team.

Variants
Bertie Ahern Irish politician, 11th Taoiseach (Prime Minister, 1997-2008)

Bartholomew Patrick "Bertie" Ahern is a former Irish Fianna Fáil politician who served as Taoiseach from 1997 to 2008, Leader of Fianna Fáil from 1994 to 2008, Leader of the Opposition from 1994 to 1997, Tánaiste and Minister for Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht from November 1994 to December 1994, Deputy Leader of Fianna Fáil from 1992 to 1994, Minister for Industry and Commerce in January 1993, Minister for Finance from 1991 to 1994, Minister for Labour from 1987 to 1991, Government Chief Whip and Minister of State at the Department of Defence from March 1982 to December 1982 and Lord Mayor of Dublin from 1986 to 1987. He served as a Teachta Dála (TD) from 1977 to 2011.

Taoiseach Head of government (Prime Minister) of Ireland

The Taoiseach is the prime minister and head of government of Ireland. The Taoiseach is appointed by the President upon the nomination of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament), and must, in order to remain in office, retain the support of a majority in the Dáil.

Basia A'Hern is an Australian film, television, and stage actress.

Other uses

Heron family of birds

The herons are long-legged freshwater and coastal birds in the family Ardeidae, with 64 recognised species, some of which are referred to as egrets or bitterns rather than herons. Members of the genera Botaurus and Ixobrychus are referred to as bitterns, and, together with the zigzag heron, or zigzag bittern, in the monotypic genus Zebrilus, form a monophyletic group within the Ardeidae. Egrets are not a biologically distinct group from the herons, and tend to be named differently because they are mainly white or have decorative plumes in breeding plumage. Herons, by evolutionary adaptation, have long beaks.

<i>The Goon Show</i> BBC Radio show broadcast between 1950 and 1960

The Goon Show was a British radio comedy programme, originally produced and broadcast by the BBC Home Service from 1951 to 1960, with occasional repeats on the BBC Light Programme. The first series, broadcast from 28 May to 20 September 1951, was titled Crazy People; subsequent series had the title The Goon Show, a title inspired, according to Spike Milligan, by a Popeye character.

Red Skelton American comedian

Richard "Red" Skelton was an American comedy entertainer. He was best known for his national radio and television acts between 1937 and 1971, and as host of the television program The Red Skelton Show. He has stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in radio and television, and also appeared in burlesque, vaudeville, films, nightclubs, and casinos, all while he pursued an entirely separate career as an artist.

See also

Herne is a surname, sometimes an alternative spelling of Hern and Hearn. Notable people with the surname include:

Related Research Articles

Bradley is an English surname derived from a place name meaning "broad wood" or "broad meadow" in Old English.

Herne the Hunter legendary character; ghost

In English folklore, Herne the Hunter is a ghost associated with Windsor Forest and Great Park in the English county of Berkshire. He is said to naturally have antlers upon his head, ride a horse, torment cattle, and rattle chains. The earliest mention of Herne comes from William Shakespeare's 1597 play The Merry Wives of Windsor, and it is impossible to know how accurately or to what degree Shakespeare may have incorporated a real local legend into his work, though there have been several later attempts to connect Herne to historical figures, pagan deities, or ancient archetypes.

Neil is a masculine given name of Gaelic origin. The name is an Anglicisation of the Irish Niall which is of disputed derivation. The Irish name may be derived from words meaning "cloud", "passionate", or "champion". As a surname, Neil is traced back to Niall of the Nine Hostages who was an Irish king and eponymous ancestor of the Uí Néill and MacNeil kindred. Most authorities cite the meaning of Neil in the context of a surname as meaning champion.

Trevor is a given name and surname of Welsh and Irish origin.

Brian is a male given name of Irish and Breton origin, as well as a surname of Occitan origin. It is common in the English-speaking world. It is possible that the name is derived from an Old Celtic word meaning "high" or "noble". For example, the element bre means "hill"; which could be transferred to mean "eminence" or "exalted one". The name is quite popular in Ireland, on account of Brian Boru, a 10th-century High King of Ireland. The name was also quite popular in East Anglia during the Middle Ages. This is because the name was introduced to England by Bretons following the Norman Conquest. Bretons also settled in Ireland along with the Normans in the 12th century, and 'their' name was mingled with the 'Irish' version. Also, in the north-west of England, the 'Irish' name was introduced by Scandinavian settlers from Ireland. Within the Gaelic speaking areas of Scotland, the name was at first only used by professional families of Irish origin. It was the fourth most popular male name in England and Wales in 1934, but a sharp decline followed over the remainder of the 20th century and by 1994 it had fallen out of the top 100. It retained its popularity in the United States for longer; its most popular period there was from 1968–1979 when it consistently ranked between eighth and tenth. The name has become increasingly popular in South America - particularly Argentina and Uruguay since the early 1990s.

Paterson is a Scottish and Irish surname meaning "Fathers' son" or "son of Patrick". In Connacht, and Ulster, the name is considered to be an Anglicised form of the Irish language surname Ó Casáin. Paterson is rarely used as a given name. There are other spellings, including Patterson. Notable people with the surname include:

Ahern, also Aherne is an Irish surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Holly is an English-language surname and given name.

Duke is a surname meaning 'the leader' or 'son of Marmaduke'. It is the 856th most common surname in the United States.

Barry is both a given name and a surname. The given name is an Anglicised form of several Irish personal names, while the surname has numerous etymological origins, and is derived from both place names and personal names.

Colin is an English-language masculine given name. It has two distinct origins:

  1. A diminutive form of "Colle", itself an Old French short form of the name Nicolas (Nicholas). This name, but not the anglicized Gaelic name, is also found in the spelling Collin. This name is formed by the Old French diminutive -in also found in Robin.
  2. An anglicized form of the Gaelic name Cuilen, Cailean, modern Irish spelling Coileáin, meaning "whelp, cub". The Old Irish word for "whelp," is cuilén. The Scottish Gaelic name is recorded in the spelling Colin from as early as the 14th century. MacCailean was a patronymic used by Clan Campbell, after Cailean Mór.

Shane is mainly a masculine given name. It is an Anglicised version of the Irish name Seaghán/Seán, which itself is cognate to the name John. Shane comes from the way the name Seán is pronounced in the Ulster dialect of the Irish language, as opposed to Shaun or Shawn.

Douglas is a Scottish masculine given name which originated from the surname Douglas. Although today the name is almost exclusively given to boys, it was used as girls name in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, in the north of England. The Scottish surname Douglas was borne by one of the most powerful families of the Kingdom of Scotland. It has sometimes been stated that the given name is connected with the given name Dougal, although it is more likely derived from the surname already mentioned.

Coen can be a masculine given name, a surname or a place name.

Bryan is a masculine given name. It is a variant spelling of the masculine given name Brian.

Brendan is an Irish masculine given name in the English language. It is derived from the Gaelic name Breandán, which is in turn derived from the earlier Old Irish Brénainn. The Old Welsh breenhin is the root of the name, meaning Prince or King. The mediaeval Latin form of the name, Brendanus, has also influenced the modern English and Irish forms. Variant spellings of Brendan are Brendon and Brenden. In some cases it is possible that the given name Brandon is also a variant of Brendan. A variant spelling of the Irish Breandán is Breanndán.

Connor is an Irish male given name, anglicised from the compound Irish word "Conchobhar", meaning "lover of hounds". Its popularity likely derived from the name of Conchobar mac Nessa, a semi-legendary king of Ulster in Dál Riata described in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. Variant forms of Connor appear across the British isles and include Conor and Conner.

Hearn family

The Hearn family is a family of Anglo-Norman origin. The name's original spelling in the 11th century was Heron or Heroun. As early as the 17th century, the spellings Hearn, Hearne, and Harn would also appear in England and the United States.

References

  1. "Hern meaning and Hern origin, relative names". babynamecollection.com. Retrieved 2007-12-30.