Invasive Species Compendium

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The Invasive Species Compendium (ISC) is an online, open access reference work covering recognition, biology, distribution, impact, and management of invasive plants and animals produced by CAB International alongside an international consortium. [1] It comprises peer-reviewed datasheets, images, and maps, a bibliographic database, and full text articles. New datasheets, data sets, and scientific literature are added on a weekly basis. The ISC has been resourced by a diverse international consortium of government departments, non-governmental organizations, and private companies. [2]

Open access Research publications that are distributed online, free of cost or other barriers

Open access (OA) is a mechanism by which research outputs are distributed online, free of cost or other barriers, and, in its most precise meaning, with the addition of an open license that removes most restrictions on use and reuse.

Invasive species Organism occurring in a new habitat

An invasive species is a species that is not native to a specific location, and that has a tendency to spread to a degree believed to cause damage to the environment, human economy or human health.

Peer review evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work

Peer review is the evaluation of work by one or more people with similar competences as the producers of the work (peers). It functions as a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review methods are used to maintain quality standards, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.

Contents

Coverage

The Invasive Species Compendium currently covers over 1,500 species with over 7,000 basic summary datasheets and 1,500 detailed datasheets. [3] In addition, it provides access to over 1,100 full text articles (in PDF format) and 75,000 article abstracts. [2]

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<i>Abies sachalinensis</i> species of plant

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References

  1. Norris, Meryl (2011-07-08). "Scottish invasives: Invasive Species Compendium". Scottish-invasives.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 2012-05-23.
  2. 1 2 "About". Cabi.org. Retrieved 2012-05-23.
  3. "News - GB non-native species secretariat". Secure.fera.defra.gov.uk. 2011-06-15. Retrieved 2012-05-23.