Jon Pareles

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Jon Pareles
Born (1953-10-25) October 25, 1953 (age 64)
Connecticut, United States
Alma mater Yale University
Occupation Critic
Journalist

Jon Pareles (born October 25, 1953) [1] is an American journalist who is the chief popular-music critic in the arts section of The New York Times . [2]

Journalist person who collects, writes and distributes news and other information

A journalist is a person who collects, writes, or distributes news or other current information to the public. A journalist's work is called journalism. A journalist can work with general issues or specialize in certain issues. However, most journalists tend to specialize, and by cooperating with other journalists, produce journals that span many topics. For example, a sports journalist covers news within the world of sports, but this journalist may be a part of a newspaper that covers many different topics.

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

<i>The New York Times</i> Daily broadsheet newspaper based in New York City

The New York Times is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership. Founded in 1851, the paper has won 125 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper. The Times is ranked 17th in the world by circulation and 2nd in the U.S.

Contents

Early life and education

Pareles was born in Connecticut. [1] He played jazz flute and piano, and graduated from Yale University with a degree in music. He began working as a music critic in 1977. [3]

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Yale University private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution.

Career

In the 1970s, he was an associate editor of Crawdaddy! , where he published his first works (outside school publications); [4] and in the 1980s, an associate editor at Rolling Stone and the music editor at The Village Voice . He started contributing to The Times in 1982. [3] He reviews popular music in the arts section of The Times. [4]

<i>Rolling Stone</i> American magazine focusing on popular culture, based in New York City

Rolling Stone is an American monthly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, California in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson. In the 1990s, the magazine shifted focus to a younger readership interested in youth-oriented television shows, film actors, and popular music. In recent years, it has resumed its traditional mix of content.

<i>The Village Voice</i> American weekly newspaper

The Village Voice was an American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly. Founded in 1955 by Dan Wolf, Ed Fancher, John Wilcock, and Norman Mailer, the Voice began as a platform for the creative community of New York City. It still is kept alive online.

Works and publications

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References

  1. 1 2 "Pareles, Jon". Current Biography . H. W. Wilson Company. 69 (11): 75. November 2008. ISSN   0011-3344 . Retrieved October 7, 2014.
  2. Ask a report: Jon Pareles, Music Critic. The New York Times .
  3. 1 2 Hay, Carla (March 20, 2004). "Meet the Critics". Billboard . Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 116 (12): 1, 88. ISSN   0006-2510 . Retrieved October 6, 2014.
  4. 1 2 Ward, Steven (July 2001). "The Grey Lady's Pop Music Man: Jon Pareles in Conversation". rockcritics.com. Retrieved August 8, 2014.
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