Lee Filters

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Lee Filters is a manufacturer of colour filters and colour gels for the entertainment lighting, film and photography industries. [1] Their colour gels for stage lighting are the industry standard in Europe while competing with other brands such as Rosco.

The company was founded in 1967 as part of the group that became Lee International. Lee Filters is now owned by Panavision. In 1980, the company was awarded the Bert Easey Technical Award of the British Society of Cinematographers for "the development of motion picture filters and control mediums". [2]

Lee Electric (Lighting) Ltd was incorporated as a business in 1961 by John and Benny Lee, two film lighting electricians. Lee Electric was primarily involved in the rental of lighting equipment for commercial and documentary productions, as all principal film and television studios were at the time equipped with their own lighting equipment.

Panavision American motion picture equipment company

Panavision is an American motion picture equipment company specializing in cameras and lenses, based in Woodland Hills, California. Formed by Robert Gottschalk as a small partnership to create anamorphic projection lenses during the widescreen boom in the 1950s, Panavision expanded its product lines to meet the demands of modern filmmakers. The company introduced its first products in 1954. Originally a provider of CinemaScope accessories, the company's line of anamorphic widescreen lenses soon became the industry leader. In 1972, Panavision helped revolutionize filmmaking with the lightweight Panaflex 35 mm movie camera. The company has introduced other groundbreaking cameras such as the Millennium XL (1999) and the digital video Genesis (2004).

British Society of Cinematographers professional association

The British Society of Cinematographers was formed in 1949 by Bert Easey, the then head of the Denham and Pinewood studio camera departments, to represent British cinematographers in the British film industry.

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-04-11. Retrieved 2013-03-10.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. http://www.bscine.com/awards/bert-easey-technical-award/