List of storms named Phanfone

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Phanfone may refer to four tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. It is a Lao term for Animal.

Due to the extensive damage and high death toll in the Philippines caused by the 2019 storm, the name Phanfone was retired by the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee in February 2020. In 2021, the Typhoon Committee chose the name Nokaen as a replacement name, which means "swallow" in Laotian.

Preceded by
Koto
Pacific typhoon season names
Nokaen
Succeeded by
Vongfong

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Tropical Storm Alice may refer to:

The name Sonamu has been the name of three tropical cyclones in the western north Pacific Ocean. In addition, the variant Sonamu was used in 2000 and 2006 before the spelling was corrected by the WMO Typhoon Committee. The name was submitted by North Korea and is a Korean word for pine.

2008 Pacific typhoon season

The 2008 Pacific typhoon season was a below average season which featured 22 named storms, eleven typhoons, and two super typhoons. The season had no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2008, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The name Usagi has been used to name four tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Japan and is the Japanese name of the constellation Lepus.

The name Danas has been used to name four tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by the Philippines and is an Austronesian verb meaning "to experience" or "to feel".

This timeline documents all the storm formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipation during the 2008 Pacific typhoon season. The 2008 Pacific typhoon season officially started on January 1, 2008 and ended on January 1, 2009. The first tropical cyclone of the season formed on January 13. The timeline also includes information which was not operationally released, meaning that information from post-storm reviews by the various warning agencies, such as information on a storm that was not operationally warned on, has been included.

The name Chedeng has been used in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific.

The name Neneng has been used in the Philippines by PAGASA in the Western Pacific.

The name Ursula has been used for one tropical cyclone in Western Pacific.

The name Melor has been used to name three tropical cyclones in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The name was contributed by Malaysia, which means a jasmine flower.

2014 Pacific typhoon season

The 2014 Pacific typhoon season was a slightly below average season, featuring 23 tropical storms, 11 typhoons, 8 super typhoons, and 7 Category 5 typhoons. The season's peak months August and September saw minimal activity caused by an unusually strong and a persistent suppressing phase of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). The season ran throughout 2014, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season began with the development of Tropical Storm Lingling on January 18, and ended after Tropical Storm Jangmi which dissipated on January 1 of the next year.

2019 Pacific typhoon season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2019

The 2019 Pacific typhoon season was the costliest Pacific typhoon season on record, just ahead of the previous year. The season was fairly above-average, producing 29 named storms, 17 typhoons, and five super typhoons. It was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season ran throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, reached tropical storm status on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record that was held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The season's first typhoon, Wutip, reached typhoon status on February 20. Wutip further intensified into a super typhoon on February 23, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record, and the strongest tropical cyclone recorded in February in the Northern Hemisphere. The season's last named storm, Phanfone, dissipated on December 29 after it made landfall in the Philippines. The accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index of this season amounted to 269 units.

Timeline of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones forming between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

Typhoon Phanfone (2014) Pacific typhoon in 2014

Typhoon Phanfone, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Neneng, was a powerful tropical cyclone which affected Japan in early October 2014. It was the eighteenth named storm and the eighth typhoon of the 2014 Pacific typhoon season.

Typhoon Nock-ten

Typhoon Nock-ten, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Nina, was the strongest Christmas Day tropical cyclone worldwide in terms of 1-minute sustained winds. Forming as a tropical depression southeast of Yap and strengthening into the twenty-sixth tropical storm of the annual typhoon season on December 21, 2016, Nock-ten intensified into the thirteenth typhoon of the season on December 23. Soon afterwards, the system underwent explosive intensification and became a Category 5-equivalent super typhoon early on December 25. Nock-ten weakened shortly afterwards before making eight landfalls over the Philippines. The typhoon weakened rapidly due to the landfalls as it entered the South China Sea on December 26, turned southwest, and ultimately dissipated on December 28 due to the winter monsoon.

Typhoon Kammuri

Typhoon Kammuri, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Tisoy, was a powerful typhoon which impacted the Philippines in early December 2019. The twenty-eighth named storm and sixteenth typhoon of the 2019 Pacific typhoon season, Kammuri developed from a tropical wave situated a couple hundred miles south of the Mariana Islands. From November 25 up until November 27, the system tracked westward at a steady pace and rate of intensification, first making minor impacts in Guam. On November 28, the system intensified into a typhoon as environmental conditions became marginally conducive for significant development. From November 29 up until late December 1, Kammuri was unable to strengthen to previous estimates due to its near stationary movement as a result of weak steering currents, upwelling itself consequently. On December 2, the system tracked westward at a much faster speed of 12 mph (19 km/h) and rapidly intensified over warm Philippine Sea waters, before making landfall in the Bicol Region of the Philippines at peak intensity as a category 4-equivalent typhoon.

Typhoon Phanfone 2019 storm in Philippines

Typhoon Phanfone, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ursula, was a relatively strong and deadly tropical cyclone which traversed through the Philippines on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day for the first time since Nock-ten in 2016.