Minutemen (anti-Communist organization)

Last updated

The Minutemen was a militant anti-Communist organization formed in the United States in the early 1960s. The founder and head of the right-wing group was Robert DePugh, a biochemist from Norborne, Missouri. The Minutemen believed that Communism would soon take over the United States. The group armed themselves and were preparing to take back the country if necessary. The Minutemen organized themselves into small cells and stockpiled weapons for an anticipated counter-revolution.

Robert Boliver "Bob" DePugh was an American anti-communist activist who founded the Minutemen militant anti-Communist organization in 1961.

Norborne, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Norborne is a city in Carroll County, Missouri, United States. The population was 708 at the 2010 census.

Communism socialist political movement and ideology

In political and social sciences, communism is the philosophical, social, political, and economic ideology and movement whose ultimate goal is the establishment of the communist society, which is a socioeconomic order structured upon the common ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes, money, and the state.

Contents

In February 1968, DePugh was indicted by a federal grand jury in Seattle, Washington for conspiracy to commit bank robbery. Also in 1968, he was arrested for violation of federal firearms laws. He skipped bail and went underground for over a year until he was caught in 1969 in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. He was released from prison in May 1973. DePugh later wrote a survival manual, Can You Survive?, and was associated briefly with Liberty Lobby.

A grand jury is a jury – a group of citizens – empowered by law to conduct legal proceedings and investigate potential criminal conduct, and determine whether criminal charges should be brought. A grand jury may subpoena physical evidence or a person to testify. A grand jury is separate from the courts, which do not preside over its functioning.

Bail is a set of pre-trial restrictions that are imposed on a suspect to ensure that they comply with the judicial process. Bail is the conditional release of a defendant with the promise to appear in court when required.

Truth or Consequences, New Mexico City in New Mexico, United States

Truth or Consequences is a city in and the county seat of Sierra County, New Mexico, United States. In 2012, the population was 6,411. It has frequently been noted on lists of unusual place names.

DePugh, 86, died at home June 30, 2009. [1]

Publications

The Minutemen's publication was a newsletter called "On Target".

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Related Research Articles

LGM-30 Minuteman 1961 family of intercontinental ballistic missiles of the United States Air Force

The LGM-30 Minuteman is a U.S. land-based intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), in service with the Air Force Global Strike Command. As of 2018, the LGM-30G Minuteman III version is the only land-based ICBM in service in the United States.

Mike Watt musician, songwriter

Michael David Watt is an American bassist, vocalist and songwriter.

Fred Hampton African-American activist

Fred Hampton was an African-American activist and revolutionary, chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party (BPP), and deputy chairman of the national BPP. Hampton and fellow Black Panther Mark Clark were killed during a raid by a tactical unit of the Cook County State's Attorney's Office, in conjunction with the Chicago Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation in December 1969.

Lillian Roxon was a noted Australian journalist and author, best known for Lillian Roxon's Rock Encyclopedia (1969).

Civil Aeronautics Board former agency of the Federal government of the United States

The Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) was an agency of the federal government of the United States that regulated aviation services, including scheduled passenger airline service, and provided air accident investigation. The agency headquarters were in Washington, D.C.

Underground press

The terms underground press or clandestine press refer to periodicals and publications that are produced without official approval, illegally or against the wishes of a dominant group. In specific recent Asian, American and Western European context, the term "underground press" has most frequently been employed to refer to the independently published and distributed underground papers associated with the counterculture of the late 1960s and early 1970s in India and Bangladesh in Asia, in the United States and Canada in North America, and the United Kingdom and other western nations. It can also refer to the newspapers produced independently in repressive regimes. In German occupied Europe, for example, a thriving underground press operated, usually in association with the Resistance. Other notable examples include the samizdat and bibuła, which operated in the Soviet Union and Poland respectively, during the Cold War.

National Renaissance Party (United States)

The National Renaissance Party (NRP) was an American neo-fascist group founded in 1949 by James Hartung Madole. It was frequently in the headlines during the 1960s and 1970s for its involvement in violent protests and riots in New York City. After Madole's death in 1979 the party faded and had completely disappeared by 1981.

The Minuteman Project was a vigilante organization started in August 2004 by a group of private individuals in the United States to extrajudicially monitor the United States – Mexico border's flow of Undocumented immigrants. Founded by Jim Gilchrist and Chris Simcox, the name derives from the Minutemen, militiamen who fought in the American Revolution. The Minuteman Project describes itself as "a citizens' Neighborhood Watch on our border", and has attracted media attention to illegal immigration.

Idris Muhammad American drummer

Idris Muhammad was an American jazz drummer who recorded extensively with many musicians, including Ahmad Jamal, Lou Donaldson, Pharoah Sanders, and Tete Montoliu.

James Walter Gilchrist Jr. is an American political activist and the co-founder and president of the Minuteman Project, an activist group whose aim is to prevent illegal immigration across the southern border of the United States.

National States Rights Party

The National States' Rights Party was a far right, white supremacist party that briefly played a minor role in the politics of the United States.

Michael Conde McGinley was the editor of a semi-monthly paper called Common Sense who received US-wide attention for a brief period due to his campaign against the nomination of Anna M. Rosenberg. This campaign led to an investigation by the House Un-American Activities Committee.

Steamhammer (band) English blues-rock band

Steamhammer was an English blues rock band from Worthing, England, whose origins were with the blues. The band was founded in 1968 by Martin Quittenton (guitar) and Kieran White. The first stable line-up consisted of Quittenton, White, Martin Pugh (guitar), Steve Davy (bass), and Michael Rushton (drums).

Robert James Cindrich is a former United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania and a former federal judicial nominee to the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit.

Tom Stagg American judge

Thomas Eaton Stagg Jr., known as Tom Stagg, was an attorney, businessman, politician and jurist who served as a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana from his appointment by President Richard Nixon in the spring of 1974 until his death. The court is based in his hometown of Shreveport, Louisiana.

The New York City Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) is an agency of the Government of New York City.

Minutemen (band) punk rock band from San Pedro, California, USA

Minutemen were an American punk rock band formed in San Pedro, California in 1980. Composed of guitarist/vocalist D. Boon, bassist/vocalist Mike Watt, and drummer George Hurley, Minutemen recorded four albums and eight EPs before Boon's death in an automobile accident in 1985; after Boon's death, the band broke up. They were noted in the California punk community for a philosophy of "jamming econo"—a sense of thriftiness reflected in their touring and presentation—while their eclectic and experimental attitude was instrumental in pioneering alternative rock and Post-hardcore.

Minutemen private colonists and militia during the American Revolutionary War

Minutemen were civilian colonists who independently organized to form well-prepared militia companies self-trained in weaponry, tactics, and military strategies from the American colonial partisan militia during the American Revolutionary War. They were also known for being ready at a minute's notice, hence the name. They provided a highly mobile, rapidly deployed force that allowed the colonies to respond immediately to war threats.

References

  1. T.J. Greaney, "Minuteman outlasted notoriety, died with regrets", Columbia Daily Tribune, Thursday, August 6, 2009.
  2. Google books, no preview

Further reading

FBI files on the Minutemen and DePugh, obtained under the FOIA and hosted at the Internet Archive

Freedom of Information Act (United States) US statute

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552, is a federal freedom of information law that requires the full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States government upon request. The Act defines agency records subject to disclosure, outlines mandatory disclosure procedures, and defines nine exemptions to the statute. President Lyndon B. Johnson, despite his misgivings, signed the Freedom of Information Act into law on July 4, 1966, and it went into effect the following year.

Internet Archive US non-profit organization founded in 1996 in San Francisco by Brewster Kahle

The Internet Archive is a San Francisco–based nonprofit digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge." It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and millions of public-domain books. In addition to its archiving function, the Archive is an activist organization, advocating for a free and open Internet.