Peck's Bad Girl

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Peck's Bad Girl
Pecks Bad Girl 1918.jpg
Film poster
Directed by Charles Giblyn
Written byTex Charwate
Produced by Samuel Goldwyn
Starring Mabel Normand
Earle Foxe
Distributed by Goldwyn Pictures Corporation
Release date
  • September 2, 1918 (1918-09-02)
Running time
50 minutes
CountryUnited States
Language Silent (English intertitles)
Mabel Normand in Peck's Bad Girl MabelNormandPecksBadGirlSuitcase.jpg
Mabel Normand in Peck's Bad Girl

Peck's Bad Girl is a 1918 comedy film directed by Charles Giblyn, written by Tex Charwate, produced by Samuel Goldwyn, and starring Mabel Normand and Earle Foxe. The black and white silent film, in the style of the Peck's Bad Boy stories, was released by the Goldwyn Pictures Corporation (a forerunner of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) in 35mm on September 2, 1918. The picture's running time is 50 minutes. [1] [2]

Contents

The status of this film is that it is now lost. [3]

There was also a 1959 TV series titled Peck's Bad Girl with an unrelated story, starring Wendell Corey & Patty McCormack.

Plot

As described in a film magazine, [4] Peck's girl Minnie (Normand) gets into so much mischief that the wiseacres of the town decide that she needs to be put to some useful occupation. A kindly lady takes her under her care and she soon becomes a more or less valuable assistant to a modiste's show. Returning to the store one evening to get a package, she comes across some sneak thieves who are burrowing beneath the bank. She spreads the alarm, captures one of the crooks, and wins the heart of a detective sent to apprehend the criminals.

Cast

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References

  1. The AFI Catalog of Feature Films: Peck's Bad Girl Retrieved June 23, 2015
  2. Progressive Silent Film List: Peck's Bad Girl at silentera.com. Retrieved June 23, 2015
  3. The Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Catalog: Peck's Bad Girl Retrieved June 23, 2015
  4. "Reviews: Peck's Bad Girl". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (14): 28. September 28, 1918. "Opened good, in spite of influenza epidemic. Run cut off by closing order. — Mark Gates, Dayton Theatre, Dayton, O."