Raphael Maklouf

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Raphael Maklouf

Born
Raphael David Maklouf

(1937-12-10) 10 December 1937 (age 84)
NationalityBritish
Education Camberwell School of Art
OccupationSculptor

Raphael David Maklouf FRSA [1] (born 10 December 1937) is a British sculptor, best known for designing an effigy of Queen Elizabeth II used on the coins of many Commonwealth nations. [2]

Maklouf was born in Jerusalem, to a Jewish family; his father was Samuel Maklouf (1911–1990, born in Safed, then in Palestine); his mother was Leonie Maklouf (born in Saarbrücken, Germany, 1915).

The family emigrated to the United Kingdom after the Second World War. Raphael Maklouf attended the Camberwell School of Art until 1958, afterwards becoming an academic lecturer for ten years. He was made an Associate of the Royal Society of British Sculptors in 1979.

One of Maklouf's Stations of the Cross in Brentwood Cathedral Terracotta Stations of the Cross by Raphael Maklouf in Brentwood Cathedral.jpg
One of Maklouf's Stations of the Cross in Brentwood Cathedral

Two of his designs were selected for British coinage on 8 August 1984, one for general circulation and another for commemorative issues. They were used on the coins of several countries from 1985 to 1997. His initials, RDM, are engraved at the base of the Queen's neck. [3] He is additionally known for his sculptural design representing the fifteen Stations of the Cross in Brentwood Cathedral. He is associated with Tower Mint Ltd, which privately produces medals, coins for collectors, and similar items.

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References

  1. "Meet the Team at The Tower Mint - Independent Coin & medallion Minters". Tower Mint UK. Retrieved 18 October 2020.
  2. The British Museum (ed.). "Raphael Maklouf" . Retrieved 24 September 2022.
  3. "Australia's most distinctive decimal coin turns 50!". Change Checker. 11 July 2019. Retrieved 18 October 2020.
Preceded by Coins of the pound sterling
Obverse sculptor

1984
Succeeded by