Repoussoir

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In two-dimensional works of art, such as painting, printmaking, photography or bas-relief, repoussoir (French:  [ʁəpuswaʁ] , pushing back) is an object along the right or left foreground that directs the viewer's eye into the composition by bracketing (framing) the edge. It became popular with Mannerist and Baroque artists, and is found frequently in Dutch seventeenth-century landscape paintings. Jacob van Ruisdael, for example, often included a tree along one side to enclose the scene (see illustration). Figures are also commonly employed as repoussoir devices by artists such as Paolo Veronese, Peter Paul Rubens and Impressionists such as Gustave Caillebotte. [1]

Painting Practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a surface

Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium to a solid surface. The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush, but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes, can be used. The final work is also called a painting.

Printmaking process through which an artistic print is created

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Photography Art, science and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation

Photography is the art, application and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film. It is employed in many fields of science, manufacturing, and business, as well as its more direct uses for art, film and video production, recreational purposes, hobby, and mass communication.

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<i>Paris Street; Rainy Day</i> painting by Gustave Caillebotte

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<i>The Jewish Cemetery</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael in the Detroit Institute of Arts

The Jewish Cemetery is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Arts.

<i>Les Orangers</i> painting by Gustave Caillebotte

Les Orangers is an oil painting by French impressionist Gustave Caillebotte. The canvas measures 155 by 117 centimetres. It was acquired by Audrey Jones Beck and was part of a collection that was on a long-term loan to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, before the collection was donated to the museum in 1999. The painting now hangs in the museum building named for Beck.

<i>View of Haarlem with Bleaching Fields</i> work by Jacob van Ruisdael (Kunsthaus Zürich)

View of Haarlem with Bleaching Fields is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Kunsthaus Zürich.

<i>Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

The Windmill of Wijk bij Duurstede is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Amsterdam Museum, on loan to the Rijksmuseum.

<i>The Ray of Light</i> painting by Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruisdael, Louvre museum

The Ray of Light, also known as Le Coup de Soleil, is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Louvre Museum.

<i>Two Watermills and an Open Sluice near Singraven</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

Two Watermills and an Open Sluice near Singraven is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the National Gallery.

<i>Landscape with Waterfall</i> painting by Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael

Landscape with Waterfall is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Amsterdam Museum, on loan to the Rijksmuseum.

<i>A Waterfall in a Rocky Landscape</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

A Waterfall in a Rocky Landscape is an oil painting on canvas by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the National Gallery.

<i>Winter Landscape near Haarlem</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

Winter Landscape near Haarlem is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Städel. This painting was documented by Hofstede de Groot in 1911, who wrote; "992. A WINTER LANDSCAPE. A snow-bound plain with trees to right and left. In the centre a road leads to the distance ; away to the right is a cottage. In the centre foreground stands a solitary lamp-post. To the left of this are two travellers with a dog. Signed in full, according to the Sedelmeyer sale-catalogue, but the Frankfort catalogue does not mention a signature ; canvas, 14 1/2 inches by 12 1/2 inches. Exhibited at Vienna, 1873, No. 165.

<i>Waterfall in a Mountainous Landscape with a Ruined Castle</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

Waterfall in a Mountainous Landscape with a Ruined Castle is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Mount Stuart House.

<i>Wooded Dunes</i> painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

Wooded Dunes, also known as Dune Landscape, Peasant Cottage in a Landscape, Wooded Dunes and Cottage in a Grove is a 1646 oil on panel painting by the Dutch Golden Age painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is in the collection of the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg.

<i>View of the Dam and Damrak at Amsterdam</i> (Boymans van Beuningen) painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

View of the Dam and Damrak at Amsterdam, also known as The Damrak in Amsterdam, is a 17th-century oil on canvas painting by the Dutch Golden Age painter Jacob van Ruisdael. Since 1866 it is in the collection of the Museum Boymans van Beuningen in Rotterdam.

<i>View of Haarlem from the Northwest, with the Bleaching Fields in the Foreground</i> painting by Jacob Isaacksz. van Ruisdael

View of Haarlem from the Northwest, with the Bleaching Fields in the Foreground is an oil on canvas painting by the Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael. It is an example of Dutch Golden Age painting and is now in the collection of the Rijksmuseum.

<i>Wheat Fields</i> (van Ruisdael) painting by Jacob van Ruisdael

Wheat Fields is a late 17th century oil painting by Jacob van Ruisdael. The painting depicts a wheat field in the Netherlands.

References

  1. Wind, Edgar (October 1938). "The revolution of history painting". Journal of the Warburg Institute. 2 (2): 117. doi:10.2307/750085. JSTOR   750085. He fulfils the function of a 'repoussoir',and by leading the imagination into a distant land,effectively offsets the shock of seeing the hero die in a modern uniform.