Rod Myers

Last updated
Rod Myers
Outfielder
Born: (1973-01-14) January 14, 1973 (age 48)
Conroe, Texas
Batted: Left
Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 21,  1996, for the  Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
September 28,  1997, for the  Kansas City Royals
MLB statistics
Batting average .268
Home runs 3
Runs batted in 20
Teams

Roderick Demond Myers (born January 14, 1973) is a former professional outfielder. He played in parts of two seasons in the Major League Baseball (MLB) , 1996 and 1997, for the Kansas City Royals. Currently owns KC Elite Athletics consulting and training.

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