Run batted in

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Albert Pujols is the most recent player to record 2,000 runs batted in during his Major League Baseball career. Pujols2019 (cropped).jpg
Albert Pujols is the most recent player to record 2,000 runs batted in during his Major League Baseball career.

A run batted in (RBI), plural runs batted in (RBI or RBIs), is a statistic in baseball and softball that credits a batter for making a play that allows a run to be scored (except in certain situations such as when an error is made on the play). For example, if the batter bats a base hit, then another player on a higher base can head home to score a run, and the batter gets credited with batting in that run.

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Before the 1920 Major League Baseball season, runs batted in were not an official baseball statistic. Nevertheless, the RBI statistic was tabulated—unofficially—from 1907 through 1919 by baseball writer Ernie Lanigan, according to the Society for American Baseball Research. [1]

Common nicknames for an RBI include "ribby" (or "ribbie"), "rib", and "ribeye". The plural of RBI is generally "RBIs", although some commentators use "RBI" as both singular and plural, as it can also stand for "runs batted in". [2] [3] [4] [5] and

Major League Baseball Rules

The 2018 edition of the Official Baseball Rules of Major League Baseball (MLB), Rule 9.04 Runs Batted In, reads: [6]

A run batted in is a statistic credited to a batter whose action at bat causes one or more runs to score, as set forth in this Rule 9.04.

(a) The official scorer shall credit the batter with a run batted in for every run that scores

(1) unaided by an error and as part of a play begun by the batter's safe hit (including the batter's home run), sacrifice bunt, sacrifice fly, infield out or fielder's choice, unless Rule 9.04(b) applies;
(2) by reason of the batter becoming a runner with the bases full (because of a base on balls, an award of first base for being touched by a pitched ball or for interference or obstruction); or
(3) when, before two are out, an error is made on a play on which a runner from third base ordinarily would score.

(b) The official scorer shall not credit a run batted in

(1) when the batter grounds into a force double play or a reverse-force double play; or
(2) when a fielder is charged with an error because the fielder muffs a throw at first base that would have completed a force double play.

(c) The official scorer's judgment must determine whether a run batted in shall be credited for a run that scores when a fielder holds the ball or throws to a wrong base. Ordinarily, if the runner keeps going, the official scorer should credit a run batted in; if the runner stops and takes off again when the runner notices the misplay, the official scorer should credit the run as scored on a fielder's choice.

From 1980 to 1988, the game-winning RBI was an additional statistic used in MLB.

Criticism

The perceived significance of the RBI is displayed by the fact that it is one of the three categories that compose the triple crown. In addition, career RBIs are often cited in debates over who should be elected to the Hall of Fame. However, critics, particularly within the field of sabermetrics, argue that RBIs measure the quality of the lineup more than it does the player himself. This is because an RBI can only be credited to a player if one or more batters preceding him in the batting order have reached base (the exception to this being a home run, in which the batter is credited with driving himself in, not just those already on base). [7] [8] This implies that better offensive teams —and therefore, the teams in which the most players get on base— tend to produce hitters with higher RBI totals than equivalent hitters on lesser-hitting teams. [9]

RBI leaders in Major League Baseball

Career

Hank Aaron, All-time career leader in RBI with 2,297. Hank Aaron 1960.png
Hank Aaron, All-time career leader in RBI with 2,297.

Totals are current through July 29, 2019. Active players are in bold.

  1. Hank Aaron – 2,297
  2. Babe Ruth – 2,214
  3. Alex Rodríguez – 2,086
  4. Albert Pujols – 2,075
  5. Cap Anson - 2,075
  6. Barry Bonds – 1,996
  7. Lou Gehrig – 1,995
  8. Stan Musial – 1,951
  9. Ty Cobb – 1,944
  10. Jimmie Foxx – 1,922
  11. Eddie Murray – 1,917
  12. Willie Mays - 1,903

Season

Hank Greenberg, Hall of Famer and 2-time MVP Hank Greenberg 1937 cropped.jpg
Hank Greenberg, Hall of Famer and 2-time MVP
  1. Hack Wilson (1930) – 191
  2. Lou Gehrig (1931) – 185
  3. Hank Greenberg (1937) – 183
  4. Jimmie Foxx (1938) – 175
  5. Lou Gehrig (1927, 1930) – 173

Game

Inning

  1. Fernando Tatís (April 23, 1999) – 8
  2. Ed Cartwright (September 23, 1890) – 7
  3. Alex Rodriguez (October 4, 2009) – 7

Postseason (single season)

  1. David Freese (2011) – 21 [11]
  2. Scott Spiezio (2002) – 19 [11]
  3. Sandy Alomar (1997) – 19 [11]
  4. David Ortiz (2004) – 19 [11]

See also

Related Research Articles

Baseball statistics play an important role in evaluating the progress of a player or team.

In baseball, an earned run is any run that was fully enabled by the offensive team's production in the face of competent play from the defensive team. Conversely, an unearned run is a run that would not have been scored without the aid of an error or a passed ball committed by the defense.

Hit (baseball) in baseball, hitting the ball into fair territory and safely reaching base without the benefit of an error or fielders choice

In baseball statistics, a hit, also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.

In baseball, a sacrifice fly is defined by Rule 9.08(d) : "Score a sacrifice fly when, before two are out, the batter hits a ball in flight handled by an outfielder or an infielder running in the outfield in fair or foul territory that

  1. is caught, and a run scores after the catch, or
  2. is dropped, and a runner scores, if in the scorer's judgment the runner could have scored after the catch had the fly ball been caught."
Stolen base in baseball, when a runner advances one or more bases before the ball has been batted

In baseball, a stolen base occurs when a runner advances to a base to which he is not entitled and the official scorer rules that the advance should be credited to the action of the runner. The umpires determine whether the runner is safe or out at the next base, but the official scorer rules on the question of credit or blame for the advance under Rule 10.

Baseball team sport

Baseball is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objective of the offensive team is to hit the ball into the field of play, allowing its players to run the bases, having them advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate. The team that scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner.

Home run In baseball, a four-base hit resulting in a run by the batter

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. A home run with a high exit velocity and good launch angle is sometimes called a "no-doubter," because it leaves no doubt that it is going to leave the park when it leaves the bat.

In baseball, fielder's choice refers to a variety of plays involving an offensive player reaching a base due to the defense's attempt to put out another baserunner, or the defensive team's indifference to his advance. Fielder's choice is not called by the umpires on the field of play; rather, it is recorded by the official scorer to account for the offensive player's advance without crediting him with an offensive statistic such as a hit or stolen base.

In baseball, a double is the act of a batter striking the pitched ball and safely reaching second base without being called out by the umpire, without the benefit of a fielder's misplay or another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. A double is a type of hit and is sometimes called a "two-bagger" or "two-base hit". For statistical and scorekeeping purposes it is denoted by 2B.

Run (baseball) run scored in baseball

In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances around first, second and third base and returns safely to home plate, touching the bases in that order, before three outs are recorded and all obligations to reach base safely on batted balls are met or assured. A player may score by hitting a home run or by any combination of plays that puts him safely "on base" as a runner and subsequently brings him home. The object of the game is for a team to score more runs than its opponent.

In baseball, a sacrifice bunt is a batter's act of deliberately bunting the ball, before there are two outs, in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base. The batter is almost always sacrificed but sometimes reaches base due to an error or fielder's choice. In that situation, if runners still advance bases, it is still scored a sacrifice bunt instead of the error or the fielder's choice. Sometimes the batter may safely reach base by simply outrunning the throw to first; this is not scored as a sacrifice bunt but rather a single.

Error (baseball) in baseball, misplaying of the ball by a fielder, resulting in runner advancement and/or failure to obtain an out

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out. The term error can also refer to the play during which an error was committed.

Official scorer Person who records the official record of events in a baseball game

In the game of baseball, the official scorer is a person appointed by the league to record the events on the field, and to send the official scoring record of the game back to the league offices. In addition to recording the events on the field such as the outcome of each plate appearance and the circumstances of any baserunner's advance around the bases, the official scorer is also charged with making judgment calls that do not affect the progress or outcome of the game. Judgment calls are primarily made about errors, unearned runs, fielder's choice, the value of hits in certain situations, and wild pitches, all of which are included in the record compiled. This record is used to compile statistics for each player and team. A box score is a summary of the official scorer's game record.

In baseball, an extra-base hit, also known as a long hit, is any base hit on which the batter is able to advance past first base without the benefit of a fielder either committing an error or opting to make a throw to retire another base runner. Extra-base hits are often not listed separately in tables of baseball statistics, but are easily determined by calculating the sum total of a batter's doubles, triples, and home runs.

Batting order (baseball) sequence in which the members of the offense bat against the pitcher

In baseball, the batting order or batting lineup is the sequence in which the members of the offense take their turns in batting against the pitcher. The batting order is the main component of a team's offensive strategy. In Major League Baseball, the batting order is set by the manager, who before the game begins must present the home plate umpire with two copies of his team's lineup card, a card on which a team's starting batting order is recorded. The home plate umpire keeps one copy of the lineup card of each team, and gives the second copy to the opposing manager. Once the home plate umpire gives the lineup cards to the opposing managers, the batting lineup is final and a manager can only make changes under the Official Baseball Rules governing substitutions. If a team bats out of order, it is a violation of baseball's rules and subject to penalty.

1926 World Series 1926 Major League Baseball championship series

The 1926 World Series, the 23rd playing of Major League Baseball's championship series, pitted the National League champion St. Louis Cardinals against the American League champion New York Yankees. The Cardinals defeated the Yankees four games to three in the best-of-seven series, which took place from October 2 to 10, 1926, at Yankee Stadium and Sportsman's Park.

Baseball scorekeeping

Baseball scorekeeping is the practice of recording the details of a baseball game as it unfolds. Professional baseball leagues hire official scorers to keep an official record of each game, but many fans keep score as well for their own enjoyment. Scorekeeping is usually done on a printed scorecard and, while official scorers must adhere precisely to one of the few different scorekeeping notations, most fans exercise some amount of creativity and adopt their own symbols and styles.

This is an alphabetical list of selected unofficial and specialized terms, phrases, and other jargon used in baseball, along with their definitions, including illustrative examples for many entries.

References

  1. The Accurate RBI Record of Babe Ruth. SABR Website. Retrieved on September 14, 2016.
  2. Barbara Ann Kipfer (2007). Word Nerd: More Than 18,000 Fascinating Facts about Words. Sourcebooks, Inc. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  3. Steven Pinker (2011). Words and Rules: The Ingredients of Language. HarperCollins. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  4. Bryan Garner (2009). Garner's Modern American Usage. Oxford University Press. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  5. "Sox try to stay clear of big hitters PCL team doesn't want to compete with Broncos, AFA". The Gazette. August 8, 1989. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  6. "OFFICIAL BASEBALL RULES 2018 Edition" (pdf). Major League Baseball. pp. 107–108. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  7. Grabiner, David. "The Sabermetric Manifesto" . Retrieved September 2, 2009.
  8. Lewis, Michael D. (2003). Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game . New York: W. W. Norton. ISBN   0-393-05765-8.
  9. "Revisiting the Myth of the RBI Guy, Part One". Driveline Mechanics. May 18, 2009. Retrieved September 2, 2009.
  10. 1 2 3 "Ten or More RBI in One Game". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. June 7, 2017. Retrieved June 7, 2017.
  11. 1 2 3 4 "David Freese breaks the all-time single-season post-season RBI record". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. October 28, 2011. Retrieved October 30, 2011.