Tie goes to the runner

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Tie goes to the runner is a popular interpretation of baseball rules. The claim is that a batter-runner who arrives on base the same time as the ball is safe. However, umpires generally reject the concept that baseball provides for a tie in this way, and instead rule on the basis that either the player or the ball has reached the base first. [1] [2]

Baseball rules The rules of baseball at different levels and in different countries

The rules of baseball differ slightly from league to league, but in general share the same basic game play.

Safe (baseball) Reaching a base safely in baseball

In baseball, a baserunner is safe when he reaches a base without being put out by various ways. While a runner is touching a base, he is usually not in jeopardy of being put out, and is thus "safe" from fielders' actions. The runner is in jeopardy once again, negating this safety, when he ceases touching the base, when forced on a force play, or when the runner commits interference.

Umpire (baseball) person charged with officiating a baseball game

In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and handling the disciplinary actions. The term is often shortened to the colloquial form ump. They are also sometimes addressed as blue at lower levels due to the common color of the uniform worn by umpires. In professional baseball, the term blue is seldom used by players or managers, who instead call the umpire by name. Although games were often officiated by a sole umpire in the formative years of the sport, since the turn of the 20th century, officiating has been commonly divided among several umpires, who form the umpiring crew. The position is analogous to that of a referee in many other sports.

The wording of rule 5.09(a)(10), formerly 6.05(j), of the Official Baseball Rules is that a batter is out when "After a third strike or after he hits a fair ball, he or first base is tagged before he touches first base". [3] Therefore, if the runner or first base is *not* tagged before he touches first base, he is safe.

In response to a question from a Little League umpire, Major League Baseball umpire Tim McClelland has written that the concept of a tie at a base does not exist, and that a runner either beats the ball or does not. [1] In 2009, umpire Mark Dewdeny, a contributor for Bleacher Report, citing McClelland, also rejected the idea of a tie, and further commented that even if a "physicist couldn't make an argument one way or the other" from watching an instant replay, the runner would still be out. [2]

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, and the oldest of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901, respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Tim McClelland American baseball umpire

Timothy Reid McClelland is an American former umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1983 to 1999 and throughout both leagues from 2000 until his retirement prior to the 2015 season. He called many important games, from post-season games to the George Brett "Pine Tar" game in 1983. He was the plate umpire for the Sammy Sosa corked bat game on June 3, 2003, when the Chicago Cubs hosted the Tampa Bay Devil Rays at Wrigley Field. He wore uniform number 36 after his promotion to the AL, and kept the number when Major League Baseball merged the American and National League umpiring staffs in 2000.

Bleacher Report Sports-related website

Bleacher Report is a website that focuses on sport and sports culture. Its headquarters are in San Francisco, with offices in New York City and London.

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References

  1. 1 2 McClelland, Tim. "Ask the Umpire". Major League Baseball . Retrieved October 28, 2016. There are no ties and there is no rule that says the tie goes to the runner. But the rule book does say that the runner must beat the ball to first base, and so if he doesn't beat the ball, then he is out. ... The only thing you can do is go by whether or not he beat the ball. If he did, then he is safe.
  2. 1 2 Dewendy, Mark (Jul 27, 2009). ""COME ON, BLUE: TIE GOES TO THE RUNNER!" No, It Does Not". Bleacher Report . Turner Broadcasting System . Retrieved October 28, 2016. NO. It does NOT. Not EVER. ... There's no such thing as a "tie" in baseball. ... DEAD EVEN. A physicist couldn't make an argument one way or the other. BLAM. "HE'S STILL OUT!" ... Gotta get there before the ball, Sparky, or you can just keep on running.
  3. "5.09 Making an Out" (PDF). Official Baseball Rules (2016 ed.). Office of the Commissioner of Baseball. p. 42. ISBN   978-0-9961140-2-8 . Retrieved October 28, 2016.