Roman Catholic Diocese of Umbriatico

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The Diocese of Umbriatico (also Diocese of Umbriaticum) (Latin: Dioecesis Umbriaticensis) was a Roman Catholic diocese located in the town of Umbriatico in the province of Crotone in southern Italian region of Calabria. In 1818, it was suppressed [1] [2] with the bull De utiliori of Pope Pius VII, and incorporated in the diocese of Cariati.

Umbriatico Comune in Calabria, Italy

Umbriatico is a comune and town in the province of Crotone, in Calabria, southern Italy. As of 2007 Umbriatico had an estimated population of 930.

Crotone Comune in Calabria, Italy

Crotone is a city and comune in Calabria. Founded c. 710 BC as the Achaean colony of Kroton, it was known as Cotrone from the Middle Ages until 1928, when its name was changed to the current one. In 1992, it became the capital of the newly established Province of Crotone. As of August 2018, its population was about 65,000.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

Contents

Ordinaries

Diocese of Umbriatico

Erected: 1030
Latin Name: Umbriaticensis
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Santa Severina

Francesco de Caprusacci was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Umbriatico (1475–1494).

Antonio Guerra was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Umbriatico (1495–1500).

Matteo de Senis was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Umbriatico (1500–1507).

  • Father Didier Gilionis, bishop-elect (17 Sep 1516 – 1520 never took effect)
  • Niccolò Fieschi, Administrator (1517 – 1520 Resigned) [4]
Niccolò Fieschi Catholic cardinal

Niccolò Fieschi was an Italian Cardinal, of a prominent family of Genoa which features in Verdi's Simon Boccanegra.

Andrea della Valle Catholic cardinal

Cardinal Andrea della Valle was an Italian clergyman and art collector.

Giovanni Piccolomini Catholic cardinal

Giovanni Piccolomini (1475–1537) was an Italian papal legate and cardinal. He was a nephew of Pope Pius III.

Vincenzo Ferrari was a Roman Catholic prelate who served as Bishop of Umbriatico (1578–1579) and Bishop of Montepeloso.

1818: Suppressed to the diocese of Cariati.

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References

  1. "Diocese of Umbriatico (Umbriaticum)" Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 23, 2016
  2. "Titular Episcopal See of Umbriatico" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Eubel, Konrad (1914). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. II (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 259.(in Latin)
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Eubel, Konrad (1923). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. III (second ed.). Münster: Libreria Regensbergiana. p. 323.(in Latin)
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice) (1935). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. IV. Münster: Libraria Regensbergiana. p. 352.(in Latin)
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Ritzler, Remigius; Sefrin, Pirminus (1952). Hierarchia catholica medii et recentioris aevi. Vol. V. Patavii: Messagero di S. Antonio. p. 398.(in Latin)