Ron Harris (ice hockey)

Last updated
Ron Harris
Ron Harris 1973.jpg
Born (1942-06-30) June 30, 1942 (age 77)
Verdun, Quebec, Canada
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Right
Played for Detroit Red Wings
Oakland Seals
Atlanta Flames
New York Rangers
Playing career 19621976

Ronald Thomas Harris (born June 30, 1942) is a retired professional ice hockey player who played 476 games in the National Hockey League. He played for the Detroit Red Wings, Oakland Seals, Atlanta Flames, and New York Rangers.

On January 13, 1968, Harris, playing with the Oakland Seals against the Minnesota North Stars, was involved in the accident that caused the death of Bill Masterton. Harris is still plagued with memories of the incident to this day and has conducted only one interview on this subject (with the St. Paul Pioneer Press in 2003) where he stated, "It bothers you the rest of your life. It wasn't dirty and it wasn't meant to happen that way. Still, it's very hard because I made the play. It's always in the back of my mind."

After Harris retired from the NHL, he began getting involved in other areas of the game, coaching the Windsor Spitfires and Spokane Flyers at the major junior level, and later working as an assistant coach for the Quebec Nordiques in the NHL.

Career statistics

Regular season Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1960–61 Hamilton Red Wings OHA-Jr. 471910631200045
1961–62 Hamilton Red WingsOHA-Jr.5072936851032525
1962–63 Detroit Red Wings NHL 10110
1962–63 Pittsburgh Hornets AHL 623182188
1963–64 Detroit Red WingsNHL30007
1963–64 Cincinnati Wings CPHL 6642125129
1964–65 Memphis Wings CPHL7018183675
1964–65 Pittsburgh HornetsAHL10000
1965–66 San Francisco Seals WHL-Sr. 5412162874721315
1966–67 California Seals WHL-Sr.31891740610112
1967–68 California/Oakland Seals NHL54461060
1968–69 Detroit Red WingsNHL733131691
1969–70 Detroit Red WingsNHL72219219940008
1970–71 Detroit Red WingsNHL42281065
1971–72 Detroit Red WingsNHL611101180
1972–73 Atlanta Flames NHL242468
1972–73 New York Rangers NHL463101317100332
1973–74 New York RangersNHL6321214251130314
1974–75 New York RangersNHL341782231019
1975–76 New York RangersNHL30110
NHL totals47620911114742843733


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