Sir John Wolstenholme, 1st Baronet

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Sir John Wolstenholme, 1st Baronet (died 1670) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640. He supported the Royalist side in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Biography

Wolstenholme was the son of Sir John Wolstenholme and his wife Catherine Fanshaw. He became a customs farmer with his father and was knighted by King Charles I. [1]

In April 1640, Wolstenholme was elected Member of Parliament for Queenborough in the Short Parliament. [2] He supported the king in the Civil War, selling property and incurring debts to provide finance for the Royalist cause. As a result, he was then fined by parliament. He and his father's partners in the customs farming business were required to pay £150,000 which led to the sale of his estates. His son Henry and brother in law Sir Thomas Dallison were both killed in the Civil War. [1]

Queenborough was a rotten borough situated on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent. From 1572 until it was abolished by the great reform act of 1832, it returned two Members of Parliament. The franchise was vested in the freemen of the town, of whom there were more than 300. Its electorate was therefore one of largest of the 56 boroughs that were abolished. Most freemen, however, were non resident.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

After the Restoration, he became a farmer of customs again and was given a patent for collecting taxes on outbound goods in the Port of London. He was created a baronet, of London, by King Charles II in 1664. [1]

The Port of London lies along the banks of the River Thames from the capital to the North Sea. Once the largest port in the world, it is currently the United Kingdom's second largest port, after Grimsby & Immingham. The port is governed by the Port of London Authority (PLA), a public trust established in 1908 whose responsibility extends over the Tideway of the River Thames, but which neither owns or operate any facilities.

Wolstenholme died in 1670 and was buried on 15 July at Stanmore in St. John's Church which had been built by his father. [3]

Stanmore suburban area of the London Borough of Harrow, in northwest London.

Stanmore is a suburban residential district of northwest London in the London Borough of Harrow. It is centred 11 miles (18 km) northwest of Charing Cross. The area, based on the ancient parish of Great Stanmore includes southern slopes of the unnamed ridge of hills rising to Stanmore Hill, one of the highest points of London, 152 metres (499 ft) high. The population of the appropriate London Borough of Harrow Ward was 11,229 at the 2011 Census. The Canons ward which covers Stanmore railway station and eastern areas had a population of 12,471 at the same census.

St John the Evangelist, Great Stanmore

St. John the Evangelist's Church, Great Stanmore is an Anglican church located in Great Stanmore, Harrow, Middlesex.

Wolstenholme married Ann Dallison of Laughton, Lincolnshire. His son Thomas succeeded to the baronetcy. [1]

Sir Thomas Wolstenholme, 2nd Baronet

Sir Thomas Wolstenholme, 2nd Baronet (c. 1622–1691) was an English baronet.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 William Betham, The Baronetage of England, or the History of the English Baronets ..., Volume 2
  2. Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 229–239.
  3. Stanmore Magna, The Environs of London: volume 3: County of Middlesex (1795), pp. 391-403. Date accessed: 5 January 2011
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Queenborough
1640
With: Sir Edward Hales, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Hales, Bt
William Harrison
Baronetage of England
New creation Baronet
(of London)
1665–1670
Succeeded by
Thomas Wolstenholme, Bt