Tertianship

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Tertianship is the final formal period of formation in the Society of Jesus. The Provincial usually invites men to begin Tertianship three to five years after finishing Formation or Graduate Studies. It is intended to be a time in which an individual steps back to critically assess his experience of living and working in the Society of Jesus and whether this is, in fact, the life to which he is being called by Christ.

Jesuit formation

Jesuit formation, or the training of Jesuits, seeks to prepare candidates for the Roman Catholic Society of Jesus spiritually, academically and practically for the ministries they will be called to offer the Church and world.

Society of Jesus male religious congregation of the Catholic Church

The Society of Jesus is a religious order of the Catholic Church headquartered in Rome. It was founded by Ignatius of Loyola with the approval of Pope Paul III in 1540. The members are called Jesuits. The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations. Jesuits work in education, research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue.

Provincial superior

A provincial superior is a major superior of a religious institute acting under the institute's Superior General and exercising a general supervision over all the members of that institute in a territorial division of the order called a province—similar to but not to be confused with an ecclesiastical province made up of particular churches or dioceses under the supervision of a Metropolitan Bishop. The division of a religious institute into provinces is generally along geographical lines, and may consist of one or more countries, or of only a part of a country. There may be, however, one or more houses of one province situated within the physical territory of another since the jurisdiction over the individual religious is personal rather than territorial. The title of the office is often abbreviated to Provincial.

Tertianship characteristically takes place either through the course of an academic year or through two consecutive summers. During this time, the Jesuit in formation, called a "tertian", will undertake an apostolic placement of teaching or service. The tertian will also undergo a thirty-day silent retreat based upon the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola. [1]

After two years in the novitiate, the Society will usually invite a novice to make a commitment through a profession of three vows – poverty, chastity and obedience. While this profession of three vows serves to bind a man to the Society of Jesus, the Society does not make its formal commitment to an individual Jesuit until that person has been with them for more than 15 years.[ clarification needed ]

Novitiate

The novitiate, also called the noviciate, is the period of training and preparation that a Christian novice monastic, apostolic, or member of a religious order undergoes prior to taking vows in order to discern whether he or she is called to vowed religious life. It often includes times of intense study, prayer, living in community, studying the vowed life, deepening one's relationship with God, and deepening one's self-awareness. It is a time of creating a new way of being in the world. The novitiate stage in most communities is a two-year period of formation. These years are "Sabbath time" to deepen one's relationship with God, to intensify the living out of the community's mission and charism, and to foster human growth. The novitiate experience for many communities includes a concentrated program of prayer, study, reflection and limited ministerial engagement.

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References

  1. "Jesuit Vocation Office". 23 June 2013. Archived from the original on 11 December 2012.