The Accompanist

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The Accompanist
Accompanistposter.jpg
North American release poster
Directed by Claude Miller
Produced byJean-Louis Livi
Written by Luc Béraud
Nina Berberova
Claude Miller
Starring Richard Bohringer
Yelena Safonova
Romane Bohringer
Music by Alain Jomy
Cinematography Yves Angelo
Edited byAlbert Jurgenson
Distributed byAMLF
Release date
November 11, 1992
Running time
102 minutes
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench
Budget$8.4 million
Box office$6.2 million [1]

The Accompanist (French: L'Accompagnatrice) is a 1992 French film directed by Claude Miller from a novel by Nina Berberova, and starring Romane Bohringer, Yelena Safonova and Richard Bohringer.

The year 1992 in film involved many significant film releases.

Claude Miller French film director, producer and screenwriter

Claude Miller was a French film director, producer and screenwriter.

Nina Nikolayevna Berberova was a Russian Empire-born writer who chronicled the lives of Russian exiles in Paris in her short stories and novels. She visited post-Soviet Russia.

Contents

Plot

In 1942 Nazi-occupied Paris, a young and impoverished accompanist named Sophie Vasseur gets a job with famed singer Irene Brice. As Irene's possessive husband and manager, Charles, a businessman collaborating with the Nazis, wrestles with his conscience, the highly impressionable Sophie becomes obsessed with Irene, taking on the role of maid as well as accompanist, living life vicariously through Irene's triumphs and affairs, especially romantic. When Irene relocates to London, Sophie goes along, much to the discomfort of Charles.

Cast

Romane Bohringer French actress

Romane Bohringer is a French actress, film director, screenwriter, and costume designer. She is the daughter of Richard Bohringer and sister of Lou Bohringer. Her parents named her after Roman Polanski.

Richard Bohringer French actor

Richard Bohringer is a French actor.

Yelena Vsevolodovna Safonova is a Soviet and Russian actress. She is an Honored Artist of Russia (2011). She was made famous by the 1985 melodrama Winter Cherry and its two sequels. In 1988, she was awarded the David di Donatello for her starring turn in Nikita Mikhalkov's film Dark Eyes.

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References