The Desperate Hours (1967 film)

Last updated
The Desperate Hours
Directed by Ted Kotcheff
Produced by Daniel Melnick
executive
David Susskind
Written by Clive Exton
Based onplay by Joseph Hayes
Release date
1967
CountryUSA
LanguageEnglish

The Desperate Hours is a 1967 TV film. It was an adaptation of the 1954 novel The Desperate Hours .

Contents

Cast

Production

The film was originally going to star George Segal and Robert Stack. [1] Stack then read the script, was unhappy his role – that of the father – had been changed into a "psychopathic heavy" and pulled out, saying it "wasn't the same story" as the novel and play. [2]

Reception

One reviewer thought the leads were miscast. [3]

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References

  1. "A.B.C.-TV PREPARING 'DESPERATE HOURS'". New York Times. May 31, 1967. ProQuest   118033113.
  2. "Relentless robert pursues quality". Los Angeles Times. Jul 20, 1967. ProQuest   155712059.
  3. MacMINN, A. (Dec 15, 1967). "TV REVIEWS". Los Angeles Times. ProQuest   155799841.