The Song of the Road

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The Song of the Road
Directed by John Baxter
Written by
Produced byJohn Baxter
Starring
CinematographyJack Parker
Edited bySidney Stone
Music by Kennedy Russell
Production
company
Distributed by Sound City Films
Release date
February 1937 [1]
Running time
71 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Song of the Road is a 1937 British drama film directed by John Baxter and starring Bransby Williams, Ernest Butcher and Muriel George. It was made at Shepperton Studios. [2] It was made as a supporting feature. Like Baxter's earlier The Song of the Plough (1933) the film examines the effect of modern technology on traditional working practices in the countryside. [3]

Contents

Synopsis

After the Local council he works for decides to replace its horse-drawn services with motor vehicles, one of the drivers spends his savings to buy the horse. Together they search the countryside looking for work, and meeting an assorted group of characters on the way.

Cast

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References

  1. Low p.388
  2. Low p.258
  3. Chibnall p.123

Bibliography