Thomas Ridell

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Sir Thomas Ridell (died 1652) was an English royalist Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Ridell was the son of Sir Thomas Ridel of Gateshead and his wife Elizabeth Conyers daughter of Sir John Conyers. He became recorder of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and was of Fenham. [1]

Gateshead town in Tyne and Wear, England

Gateshead is a large town in Tyne and Wear, England, on the southern bank of the River Tyne opposite Newcastle upon Tyne. Gateshead and Newcastle are joined by seven bridges across the Tyne, including the Gateshead Millennium Bridge. The town is known for its architecture, including the Sage Gateshead, the Angel of the North and the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art. Residents of Gateshead, like the rest of Tyneside, are referred to as Geordies. Gateshead's population in 2011 was 120,046.

In the Civil War, Ridell espoused the royal cause with great zeal. He commanded a regiment of foot for the king and was governor of Tynemouth Castle. A reward of one thousand pounds was offered for his capture. He escaped from Berwick in a small fishing smack. His lordship of Tunstal was sold to satisfy composition. [1]

Ridell died in exile at Antwerp in 1652. [1]

Ridell married in 1629 Barbara Calverley widow of Ralph Calverley and daughter of Sir Alexander Davison of Blakiston. [1]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Henry Anderson
William Jenison
Member of Parliament for Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK Parliament constituency)
1621
With: Henry Anderson
Succeeded by
Sir Peter Riddel
Henry Anderson
Preceded by
Sir Peter Riddel
Henry Anderson
Member of Parliament for Newcastle-upon-Tyne
1628–1629
With: Sir Peter Riddel
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640