Thomas Rosling Howlett

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Thomas Rosling Howlett (1827-1898) was a Baptist pastor and early proponent of British Israelism. He authored Anglo-Israel, the Jewish problem (1892) considered one of the most influential works on the British-Israel teaching. [1] [2]

British Israelism Christian movement, according to which the people of England are the descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel

British Israelism is a pseudoarchaeological movement which holds the view that the people of the British Isles are "genetically, racially, and linguistically the direct descendants" of the Ten Lost Tribes of ancient Israel. With roots in the 16th century, British Israelism was inspired by several 19th-century English writings such as John Wilson's 1840 Our Israelitish Origin. The movement never had a head organisation or a centralized structure. Various British Israelite organisations were set up throughout the British Empire as well as in America from the 1870s; a number of these organisations are active as of the early 21st century. In America, its ideas gave rise to the Christian Identity movement.

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References

  1. New York Times Biography
  2. Radical religion in America, Jeffrey Kaplan, Syracuse University Press, 1997, p. 209.