Thomas Roussel

Last updated
Thomas Roussel
Thomas Roussel.jpg
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 187 lb (85 kg; 13 st 5 lb)
Position Defence
National teamFlag of France.svg  France
Playing careerpresent

Thomas Roussel (born November 22, 1985 in Amiens) is a professional French ice hockey defenceman who played at the 2009 IIHF World Championship as a member of the France National men's ice hockey team. [1] [2] [3]

Amiens Prefecture and commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Amiens is a city and commune in northern France, 120 km (75 mi) north of Paris and 100 km (62 mi) south-west of Lille. It is the capital of the Somme department in Hauts-de-France. The city had a population of 136,105 according to the 2006 census, and one of the biggest university hospitals in France with a capacity of 1,200 beds. Amiens Cathedral, the tallest of the large, classic, Gothic churches of the 13th century and the largest in France of its kind, is a World Heritage Site. The author Jules Verne lived in Amiens from 1871 until his death in 1905, and served on the city council for 15 years.

French people are a Romance-speaking ethnic group and nation who are identified with the country of France. This connection may be ethnic, legal, historical, or cultural.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Contents

Career

Roussel was added to the roster of The Arizona Sundogs of the Central Hockey League for the 2009-10 season. Roussel had previously played in France for the last season and had skated in France for his entire playing career before joining the Sundogs.

Central Hockey League North American mid-level minor professional ice hockey league which operated in the late 20th and early 21st centuries

The Central Hockey League (CHL) was a North American mid-level minor professional ice hockey league which operated from 1992 until 2014. Until 2013, it was owned by Global Entertainment Corporation, at which point it was purchased by the individual franchise owners. As of the end of its final season in 2014, three of the 30 National Hockey League teams had affiliations with the CHL: the Dallas Stars, Minnesota Wild, and Tampa Bay Lightning.

France Republic in Europe with several non-European regions

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.02 million. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

The defenceman had appeared in 140 regular season games with Amiens, recording eight goals, 23 assists and 221 penalty minutes (PIM). Roussel set career highs in goals (3), assists (11) and penalty minutes (99) last season. In 33 combined tournament and playoff contests, he collected eight points (3g/5a) and 52 PIM. [1] [2]

Roussel was 23 years old when he started for the Sundogs and is 6-foot and weighed 187-pounds. Roussel who is a native of France also appeared in six games with Team France during the 2009 International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Championships in Switzerland. He had one assist and two PIM in six games. [1] [2]

Switzerland Federal republic in Central Europe

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state situated in the confluence of western, central, and southern Europe. It is a federal republic composed of 26 cantons, with federal authorities seated in Bern. Switzerland is a landlocked country bordered by Italy to the south, France to the west, Germany to the north, and Austria and Liechtenstein to the east. It is geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi), and land area of 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi). While the Alps occupy the greater part of the territory, the Swiss population of approximately 8.5 million is concentrated mostly on the plateau, where the largest cities are located, among them the two global cities and economic centres of Zürich and Geneva.

See also

Arizona Sundogs minor league professional ice hockey team

The Arizona Sundogs were a minor league professional ice hockey team based in Prescott Valley, Arizona. They played in the Central Hockey League from 2006 to 2014 with their home games at Tim's Toyota Center.

France mens national ice hockey team mens national ice hockey team representing France

The France men's national ice hockey team has participated in the IIHF European Championships, the IIHF World Hockey Championships and the Olympic Games. As of 2016, it is ranked 14th in the world in the IIHF World Rankings. The team is overseen by the Fédération Française de Hockey sur Glace. Notable recent wins include upsets against Russia at the 2013 IIHF World Championship, Canada at the 2014 IIHF World Championship, and a triumphant 5–1 over Finland as the tournament host of 2017 IIHF World Championship.

2009 IIHF World Championship rosters Wikimedia list article

The 2009 IIHF World Championship rosters consisted of 396 players from 16 national ice hockey teams. Run by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF), the 2009 IIHF World Championship, held in Berne and Zurich-Kloten, Switzerland, was the 73rd edition of the tournament. Russia won the championship, the third time they had done so; it was their 25th championship if it is included with those won by the Soviet Union team.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Switzerland edge France 1-0 in hockey opener". Swiss Info. April 24, 2009. Switzerland have defeated France with a score of 1-0 in their opening game at the 2009 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship in Bern.
  2. 1 2 3 "Sundogs Signs a Pair of D-Men with World Class Experience". Central Hockey League. Defenseman Roussel Brings IIHF World Championships Experience
  3. IIHF (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. p. 181. ISBN   978-0-9867964-0-1.