Thomas Thorburn

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Thomas William Thorburn (April 13, 1913 - March 13, 2003) was a Swedish economist, and Professor of Business Administration at the Stockholm School of Economics, known from his work on the "Supply and demand of water transport" (1960), [1] and the "Cost-benefit analysis in language planning" (1971). [2]

Stockholm School of Economics Swedish business school

The Stockholm School of Economics is one of Europe's leading business schools. SSE offers BSc, MSc and MBA programs, along with highly regarded PhD- and Executive Education programs. SSE's Master program in Finance is ranked no.18 worldwide as of 2018. The Masters in Management program is ranked no. 12 worldwide by the Financial Times. QS ranks SSE no.26 among universities in the field of economics worldwide. The school is the only privately funded university in Sweden and is often considered as the most selective and prestigious academic institution in the Nordics.

Born in Uddevalla, Thorburn obtained his PhD in 1960 at the Stockholm School of Economics with the thesis, entitled "Supply and demand of water transport: studies in cost and revenue structures of ships, ports and transport buyers with respect to their effects on supply and demand of water carriage of goods."

Uddevalla Place in Bohuslän, Sweden

Uddevalla is a town and the seat of Uddevalla Municipality in Västra Götaland County, Sweden. In 2010, it had a population of 31,212.

After his graduation Thorburn served his academic career at the Stockholm School of Economics, where he was Professor in Business Administration from 1961 to 1978. He was succeeded by Nils Brunsson.

Nils Gustav Magnus Brunsson is a Swedish organizational theorist, and Professor in Management at Uppsala University. He is most known for his works in the field of new institutionalism, such as "The organization of hypocrisy" (1989), "The reforming organization" (1993) and "A world of standards" (2010).

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References

  1. Robinson, Ross. "Ports as elements in value-driven chain systems: the new paradigm." Maritime Policy & Management 29.3 (2002): 241-255.
  2. Fasold, Ralph W., and Robert Hooke. The sociolinguistics of society. Vol. 1. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1984.