Thomas Watson (Puritan)

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Thomas Watson

Thomas Watson (c. 1620 1686) was an English, Nonconformist, Puritan preacher and author.

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Contents

He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, [1] where he was noted for remarkably intense study. In 1646 he commenced a sixteen-year pastorate at St. Stephen's, Walbrook. He showed strong Presbyterian views during the civil war, with, however, an attachment to the king, and in 1651 he was imprisoned briefly with some other ministers for his share in Christopher Love's plot to recall Charles II of England. He was released on 30 June 1652, and was formally reinstated as vicar of St. Stephen's Walbrook. He obtained great fame and popularity as a preacher until the Restoration, when he was ejected for Nonconformity. Notwithstanding the rigor of the acts against dissenters, Watson continued to exercise his ministry privately as he found opportunity. Upon the Declaration of Indulgence in 1672 he obtained a licence to preach at the great hall in Crosby House. After preaching there for several years, his health gave way, and he retired to Barnston, Essex, where he died suddenly while praying in secret. He was buried on 28 July 1686.

Writing

Watson still has numerous titles available in print. His works include:

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The Godly Man's Picture is a work of systematic theology by Thomas Watson, a 17th century English Puritan preacher. The full title is The Godly Man's Picture Drawn with a Scripture Pencil, or, Some Characteristic Marks of a Man who is Going to Heaven. The book is a work of English Puritan spirituality.

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References

  1. "Watson, Thomas (WT635T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.

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