Thomastik-Infeld

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Thomastik-Infeld is an Austrian company founded in 1919, located in Vienna developing and producing strings and rosins for bowed and fretted string instruments.

Vienna Capital city and state in Austria

Vienna is the federal capital and largest city of Austria, and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million, and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union. Until the beginning of the 20th century, it was the largest German-speaking city in the world, and before the splitting of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in World War I, the city had 2 million inhabitants. Today, it has the second largest number of German speakers after Berlin. Vienna is host to many major international organizations, including the United Nations and OPEC. The city is located in the eastern part of Austria and is close to the borders of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. These regions work together in a European Centrope border region. Along with nearby Bratislava, Vienna forms a metropolitan region with 3 million inhabitants. In 2001, the city centre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In July 2017 it was moved to the list of World Heritage in Danger.

Rosin organic substance

Rosin, also called colophony or Greek pitch, is a solid form of resin obtained from pines and some other plants, mostly conifers, produced by heating fresh liquid resin to vaporize the volatile liquid terpene components. It is semi-transparent and varies in color from yellow to black. At room temperature rosin is brittle, but it melts at stove-top temperature. It chiefly consists of various resin acids, especially abietic acid. The term "colophony" comes from colophonia resina, Latin for "resin from Colophon", an ancient Ionic city.

String instrument musical instrument that generates tones by one or more strings stretched between two points

String instruments, stringed instruments, or chordophones are musical instruments that produce sound from vibrating strings when the performer plays or sounds the strings in some manner.

The company still makes "Dominant" strings, one of the earliest brands of perlon string, now considered a standard for comparison to other synthetic string sets. Other string brands from the company include:

Nylon 6 nylon polymer and synthetic fibre

Nylon 6 or polycaprolactam is a polymer developed by Paul Schlack at IG Farben to reproduce the properties of nylon 6,6 without violating the patent on its production. It is a semicrystalline polyamide. Unlike most other nylons, nylon 6 is not a condensation polymer, but instead is formed by ring-opening polymerization; this makes it a special case in the comparison between condensation and addition polymers. Its competition with nylon 6,6 and the example it set have also shaped the economics of the synthetic fiber industry. It is sold under numerous trade names including Perlon (Germany), Dederon, Nylatron, Capron, Ultramid, Akulon, Kapron, and Durethan.

History

In 1919, Dr. Franz Thomastik, a violin maker, and Otto Infeld, a civil engineer, decided to found a company. They started manufacturing steel strings.

In those years, the conventional gut string was challenged by another kind of string type; Thomastik-Infeld offered this type of string, making the brand very popular for virtuosi across the world.

The company was run by Peter Infeld from 1994 until his death on April 15, 2009. He was 67 years old. The company is now run by Zdenka Infeld.


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