Thomastown (Parliament of Ireland constituency)

Last updated
Thomastown
Former Borough constituency
for the Irish House of Commons
Former constituency
Created1541 (1541)
Abolished1800
Replaced byDisenfranchised

Thomastown was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800. Following the Act of Union 1800 the borough was disenfranchised.

Irish House of Commons lower house of the irish parliament (until 1800)

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

Contents

Members of Parliament

Robert Shapcote was an English lawyer from Devon and four times Member of Parliament for Tiverton in 1646–1649, 1654, 1656 and 1660. He sat in the Irish House of Commons for Wicklow Borough from 1661 to 1665 and was briefly Attorney-General for Ireland. He fought in the Parliamentary army in the Civil War.

1689–1801

ElectionFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
1689 Patriot Parliament Robert Grace, Snr Robert Grace, Jnr
1692 William Harrison John Hayes
1695 Christopher Hewetson Arthur Bushe
1703 John Beauchamp
1713 Amyas Bushe
1715 William Flower John Cuffe
1715 William Despard
1721 Richard Bettesworth
1727 Luke Gardiner Nicholas Aylward
1755 Redmond Morres
1757 Hon. Joseph Leeson
1761 Alexander McAuley Thomas Eyre
1767 Lord Frederick Campbell
1768 James Agar Thomas Maunsell
1769 George Dunbar
1776 Robert Forde Edward Bellingham Swan
1783 George Roth Patrick Welch
1786 George Bunbury
1790 George Burdett
1798 George Dunbar James Kearney
March 1800 Hon. Charles William Stewart
April 1800 William Gardiner
May 1800 John Francis Cradock
1801Constituency disenfranchised

See also

Thomastown Town in Leinster, Ireland

Thomastown, historically known as Grennan, is a town in County Kilkenny in the province of Leinster in the south-east of Ireland. It is a lively market town along a stretch of the River Nore which is known for its salmon and trout, with a number of historical landmarks in the vicinity. Visitor attractions include Jerpoint Abbey, Kilfane Glen gardens, and Mount Juliet Golf Course.

County Kilkenny County in the Republic of Ireland

County Kilkenny is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the South-East Region. It is named after the city of Kilkenny. Kilkenny County Council is the local authority for the county. As of the 2016 census the population of the county was 99,232. The county was based on the historic Gaelic kingdom of Ossory (Osraighe), which was co-terminus with the Diocese of Ossory.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 http://www.tara.tcd.ie/handle/2262/77206
  2. https://archive.org/stream/parliamentaryme00belmgoog/parliamentaryme00belmgoog_djvu.txt
  3. Parliamentary Papers, Volume 62, Part 2. p. 621.
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